University of Khartoum

Performance of Small Irrigation Pumps in Khartoum State

Performance of Small Irrigation Pumps in Khartoum State

Show full item record

Title: Performance of Small Irrigation Pumps in Khartoum State
Author: Khalid, Nezar Abd Al Hameed Mustafa
Abstract: This study was conducted on pumps in small private farms, which are distributed around the bank of the Blue Nile, White Nile and the Main Nile in Khartoum State. The pumps are mostly Indian pumps with diameters of 76.2-101.6 mm (3-4 inch). The pumps are usually faced by problems such as poor performance and high cost of pumping. The study depended mainly on primary data, which were collected through field surveys from a random sample of 43 pump irrigated schemes from three locations, Blue Nile (14 schemes), White Nile (15 schemes) and Main Nile (14 schemes). The parameters measured included the static head, friction head, total head, discharge per unit time, pipe length, size and the amount of power consumed. The results indicated that, the pump efficiencies are generally low ranging between 17.65 and 62.9 percent with a mean of 43.03 percent. This low efficiency is attributed to many factors including pump selection, water source, installation, pump size, pipe length, total head, friction head, management and social factors. These factors were studied for each pump and analyzed statistically using t-test, f-test and correlation coefficient to show their effect on pump efficiency. The statistical analysis revealed that, the technical factors (i.e pipe length, total head, friction head and water source) and management factors (i.e maintenance level) significantly affect pump efficiency. Furthermore, these pumps were found to be installed at heads with an average of 8.6 m, which is lower by about (50% - 100%) from the range 13-17 m recommended by their manufactures. The results showed that, the amount of water pumped in cubic meter per day was significantly higher than the irrigation requirement. This indicates that, these pumps were not appropriately used. The amount of fuel consumed (power) was significantly higher than that actually required. The cost of irrigation per hour as a function of the optimum irrigation depth are 113.11, 104.83 and 145.22 Sudanese dinar/hr for Blue Nile, White Nile and Main Nile, respectively. General, the running costs (mainly fuel cost) were higher than the fixed costs
Description: 2003
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/handle/123456789/10443
Date: 2015-05-10


Files in this item

Files Size Format View Description

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

Share

Search DSpace


Browse

My Account