University of Khartoum

الوظائف العليا في أنظمة الخدمة المدنية لدول مجلس التعاون لدول الخليج العربية

الوظائف العليا في أنظمة الخدمة المدنية لدول مجلس التعاون لدول الخليج العربية

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dc.contributor.advisor د. إبراهيم أبو عوف محمد en_US
dc.contributor.author منصور بن عبدالعزيز المعشوق, المعشوق
dc.date.accessioned 2015-06-14T10:23:59Z
dc.date.available 2015-06-14T10:23:59Z
dc.date.issued 2015-06-14
dc.date.submitted 2003
dc.identifier.uri http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/handle/123456789/12078
dc.description.abstract This is the subject of thesis presented by the student mansour Almashouq to qualify for the P.H.D in public Administration from Khartoum university (1424H\2003AD). The above is an analytical comparative study which examines the affairs of the senior positions in the civil service laws of the G.C.C Countries, which comprise the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, the Kingdom of Bahrain, the Sultanate of Oman, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar, and Kuwait. The question with which the study deals is best expressed by the question of how top-level positions figure in the civil service regulations and laws in GCC countries. The thesis of this research based on hypothesis that top-level positions are similar in as far as appointment, promotion, transfer, deputation, secondment, vacations, duties, restrictions, investigation, disciplinary actions, and termination of service are concerned. The study contained ten chapters, each of which deals with one of the aforesaid subjects. This is apart from what the researcher brought for ward as definitions of terms, the boundaries of the study, its importance and objectives, as well as informative introduction to the G.C.C countries. The researcher followed the methodology of office research. He started with the literature that covered the Islamic and historical heritage of public administration issues, as well as the products of Western thought that deal with top-level positions. The principles followed in choosing administrative leaders were reviewed, and an account was offered of the development of civil service regulations in the United States of America and the United Kingdom, where the Merit System had replaced the Patronage System. The study offered next an account of employment concepts and procedures, starting with selection and appointment and covering the whole process up to the termination of service. This account was based on official sources and on objective comparisons of the practices in the various GCC countries in these matters. The researcher discussed the idea introduced in the thesis of his study, and confirmed it as accurate. The thesis argued that there was a similarity in civil service regulations related to top-level positions in as far as appointment, promotion, transfer, deputation, secondment, vacations, duties, restrictions, investigation, disciplinary actions, and termination of service were concerned. In appointment for example, GCC countries concur in that two authorities were involved, one proposed and nominated, and the other approved. The regulations were also similar in following the principle that the political system was also involved in the appointment of this class of public employees. Likewise, GCC countries share in common other conditions for appointment to such position; namely, that the would-be employee should be a citizen of the country, should be known for his good conduct and background, should not have been sentenced to a restrictive penalty for a disgraceful or dishonest offence, and should not have been dismissed from service for disciplinary considerations, unless he had been subject to an interdiction period that ranges from two years in the Omani system, three years in the Saudi and Kuwaiti systems, and four years in the United Arab Emirates, to six years in Qatar. As for the minimum age requirement for appointment in the public service, the systems of the Emirates, Bahrain, Kuwait, and Qatar agreed on a minimum 18 Gregorian years, while the minimum in the Saudi system was 17 Hijri years and in the Omani system 16 Gregorian years. In regards to promotion, the systems of Gulf countries all required educational qualifications, experience, and the availability of a vacant position. With the exception of the Qatari and Saudi systems, promotion had to be to the following rank. Those systems allowed the transfer of high level employees but had no explicit, specific conditions and controls for the transfer of employees in this category. The systems also allowed the deputation of an employee to hold another job, whether within the government agency he belonged to or in another public office. Furthermore, the systems allowed the second mint of high-level employees to public institutions, international and regional organizations, the private sector, and voluntary organizations. The systems agreed that the second mint decision had to be made by the party authorized to make the appointment and that the concerned employee fully retains his rights in his original place of employment. The systems of Gulf countries had similar conditions for vacations and vacation types, but they differ in the conditions and regulations governing each type. All systems agree in their equal treatment of highlevel officials and other employees in regards to all leaves other than the annual vacation; employees with high-level positions enjoy a longer annual vacation in all countries other that Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, where top officials and other employees enjoy the same vacation privileges. Civil service regulations in Gulf countries were similar in regards to employee duties and things that should be avoided. This covered maintaining the dignity and prestige of one’s office, and observing the code of courtesy and politeness. It also covered a prohibition of political activity, the performance of somebody else’s work, disclosing secrets related to the office, and involvement in commercial activities. The systems were also similar in the disciplinary actions to be taken against employees who fail to carry out the duties of their office or violate any prohibition. They were also similar in the guarantees they offered to disciplined employees, emphasizing their right to be informed of the charges against them and to defend themselves. There was also a similarity in the kind of disciplinary actions that could be taken against top-level employees. These included reprimand, unpaid three-month suspension from work (with the exception of the Saudi system), and discharge from office. Systems in Gulf countries likewise agreed on the factors determining service termination, which could either be incurred by regulations or done at the employee’s request, through resignation or abstention from work. Regulations called for service termination when the employee reached retirement age, which was sixty Hijri years in Saudi Arabia and sixty Gregorian years in other countries. Other regulations called for service termination for disqualification (only in Saudi Arabia), lack of physical fitness, criminal indictment, cancellation of the position, withdrawal of citizenship, and death. The study recommended expansion of top level appointments to enhance administrative development, creation of the office of “First Deputy,” setting up a commission of deputies in ministries, support for the GCC unit in charge of civil service, and more intensified exchange of leaderships and offices between GCC countries. The study included several conclusions and recommendations that aim at increasing the efficiency of top-level position holders and, at the same time, helping in the development of GCC civil service systems. Major recommendations included intensification of modern technology utilization; rationalization of office hours; improvement of women employment and retirement conditions; updating of the systems of civil service, investigation, and disciplinary measures; and the introduction of the career path and job rotation systems. The researcher concluded by emphasizing the role of top-level position holders, which called for activating the conditions of their service with full transparency and responsibility. He called for allowing the practice of exchange of expertise between the public and private sectors in filling these positions. The researcher based his conclusions on the belief that the future would witness a greater role for top-level office holders in policy-making; government agency administration; and interaction with the challenges of globalization, world trade, and international, Arab, regional, and bilateral agreements; as well as response to constitutional developments and the increase in introducing new laws and regulations. In addition to all this, these officials would play a role in implementing, monitoring, and following up agreements between GCC countries. Finally, the researcher hopes that the conclusions, recommendations, and suggestion he has offered in this study will receive the attention and consideration they merit, for the development of civil service in GCC countries, in general, and top-level positions in particular. He also hopes that all gaps in these system will be dealt with. He is hopeful that the effort he has made will serve as a motivation for further research that aims at the development of civil service system in GCC countries, in order to achieve progress and prosperity, and to move the society of Gulf countries to a future in which all members enjoy economic and social security, as well as opportunities to express their talents and abilities in order to arrive at the desired cultural level. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.title الوظائف العليا في أنظمة الخدمة المدنية لدول مجلس التعاون لدول الخليج العربية en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.Degree M.Sc en_US
dc.Faculty معهد دراسات الإدارة العامة والحكم الاتحادي en_US

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