University of Khartoum

Physicochemical Properties And Microbial Load Of Cold Stored Sudanese Beef And Lamb Loin Cuts

Physicochemical Properties And Microbial Load Of Cold Stored Sudanese Beef And Lamb Loin Cuts

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Title: Physicochemical Properties And Microbial Load Of Cold Stored Sudanese Beef And Lamb Loin Cuts
Author: Hala Saeed Adlan Mohammed, Mohammed
Abstract: Physicochemical Properties and Microbial Load of Cold Stored Sudanese Beef and Lamb Loin Cuts M.Sc. dissertation By Hala Saeed Adlan Mohammed Abstract: The objective of this study was to determine the individual and interactive effects of species (lamb and beef) and cold storage period on the physicochemical properties and microbial load of meats from the loin. Fresh loin cuts were obtained aseptically from the carcasses of two species (beef and lamb) and stored refrigerated at 4± 2I0;C for a period of up to 7 days. The pH, water holding capacity (WHC), proximate composition, amino acids profile, peroxide value (PV) and microbial counts [total viable count (TVC), total coliform (TC), Escherichia coli and staphylococcus] were determined at the designated storage period for each species. At any one storage period tested, the results showed that beef loin cut had significantly (PX04;0.05) higher moisture, protein and ash but less fat content than that of lamb. Regardless of the species, all the chemical components showed a gradual decrease with the increase in storage period. Within each species, the WHC decreased and PV increased significantly (PX04;0.05) with increase in the storage period. Irrespective of the storage period, lamb loin cut had higher PV than beef loin cut indicating that lamb loin cut is more prone to oxidative rancidity than beef loin cut. Initially (day zero) lamb loin cut had higher essential amino acid (ESAA) (lysine, leucine and isoleucine) than beef loin cut. However, the latter was superior to lamb loin cut in phenylalanine and histidine, and the loin cut from the two species had similar valine, threonine and methionine contents. At any storage period tested, beef had higher contents of total non-essential amino acids (NEAA), over all amino acids and protein percentage (on dry matter and defatted basis). However when ESAA/NEAA ratio was considered, lamb had higher ratio than beef except on day 3 of storage. Throughout the storage period, lamb had higher TVC, TC and E.coli counts than beef. Initially (day zero), beef had higher Staph count than lamb, thereafter (day 3 and day 7) the reverse was true. Irrespective of the species, the microbial counts increased with increase in the storage period. It was concluded that the physicochemical properties and microbial load are under control and the microbial counts are under the acceptable limits; yet, more attention is needed upon meat handling particularly lamb meat. English Abstract
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/handle/123456789/12449
Date: 2015-06-15


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