University of Khartoum

ما قيمة الحياة البرية ؟ What’s wild life worth

ما قيمة الحياة البرية ؟ What’s wild life worth

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Title: ما قيمة الحياة البرية ؟ What’s wild life worth
Author: سعدية احمد يونس
Abstract: This piece of work is based on the translation (into Arabic) of a book entitled “What’s wild life worth?” the book addresses this topic in 9 chapters. Chapter one shows that wild life makes a big contribution to developing countries and describes these contributions and show how they are executed. The authors call for better evaluation, development and conservation of wild life and suggest that for sustainability conservation should be linked to development. Chapter two deals with the benefits of wild life: direct benefits consist of forage for animals and food for man. Game meat sells for more than beef in third world countries. Indirect benefits consist of export trade in ivory, rhino's horns and turtle shells. Chapter three talks about aquatic wild life whereby fish constitutes major food element in many countries of Africa, S.E. Asia and Latin America. Fresh water and marine fishes are supplemented by aqua culture. Export trade in fish comes next only to timber which is the most lucrative wild life product. Chapter four highlights the benefits of wild green vegetables which are rich in vitamins and minerals and trace elements essential for human health. It also highlights the role of wild palms as a source of edible oil and starch (Sago) and the role of big wild trees which give gums and resins used in cosmetic industry. Chapter five describes timber as the biggest and most important wild life product. Fuel in about 90% of house holds in developing countries is provided by wood. Besides domestic use wood fuel and charcoal are used in small industries. Timber is used in construction and furniture and is leading in export trade. Importance of bamboo & rattan is also discussed. Chapter six: shows that wild plants are the only source of herbal medicine in all traditional medical systems, however few wild plants are used in western medicine. The most pronounced contribution to western medicine is the hormone diosgenin from wild yam and form the base for contraceptive pills. Wild animals are used only in medical research however few domestic ones provide some hormones for human use. Chapter seven talks about the importance of wild genetic resources and explains how wild plants confer useful characteristic to their domestic relatives and that through wild genes. Such chrematistics are: higher yield, tolerance to drought, tolerance to frost and many more but most important is diseases and pest resistance. Chapter eight describes how wild life provide ecological support. Ecosystems protect man and his properties. Forests, coral reefs, mangroves, and water-shed forests act as ecological buffers that reduce the impact of ecological changes, and most importantly protect the habitat. Loss of habitat leads to extinction in the long run. Chapter nine summarizes the contributions of wild life, warns of the dangers of over exploitation and calls for its development and protection. Recommendations proposed by the World Conservation Strategy in this respect are discussed
Description: 108 Pages
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/handle/123456789/12476
Date: 2015-06-15


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