University of Khartoum

Effect of Burning and Time Taken from Cut to Mill on Physicochemical Properties of Sugarcane Products and Byproducts

Effect of Burning and Time Taken from Cut to Mill on Physicochemical Properties of Sugarcane Products and Byproducts

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Title: Effect of Burning and Time Taken from Cut to Mill on Physicochemical Properties of Sugarcane Products and Byproducts
Author: Osman Ahmed Osman, Mohamed
Abstract: Comprehensive physicochemical analysis was carried out for products of sugarcane in an attempt to find the effect of burning and the time taken from cut to mill on cane deterioration and consequently on the quality and quantity of sugars and by-products (molasses and bagasse). The analysis was conducted on juices from three varieties of cane; namely, Co-6806, Co-527 and Co-986, and on samples of sugar crystals, molasses and bagasses. The samples were obtained from New Halfa sugar factory for two seasons (2007/2008 – 2008/2009). The analysis included determination of dextran levels, sucrose, reducing sugars, invert sugars, total soluble solids (TSS), and sweetness (purity), acidity, ash, nitrogen and consequently protein content, fiber, lignin, cellulose, and hemicelluloses. Similarly physical properties were measured mainly: colour, viscosity, and particle size of sugar crystals. The results revealed that the average levels of dextran in sugars, juices and molasses ranged between 329 and 2012 ppm for burnt cane juices and 268.3 to 924 ppm for green cane juices. The levels were increased with the time taken from cut to mill. The levels of dextran in sugar and molasses ranged between 296 and 1860 ppm and 412 and 2247 ppm respectively for the duration of 3 to 48 hours after harvesting. The total soluble solids (TSS) were 99.5%, 20.6% and 86.8% for sugars, juices and molasses, respectively, whereas it was 4.8% for bagasses. The average percentage of sucrose in molasses was 32.6%, whereas it was 98.35%, 18.30% and 18.20% for sugars, burnt cane juice and green cane juice, respectively, while it was 2.39% for bagasses. The sweetness of sugars, burnt cane and green cane juices and molasses, was 98.68%, 89%, 88.7% and 37.24% respectively. The sucrose content and sweetness, measured by chromatographic techniques (TLC and HPLC), were slightly lower than that described above, due to the presence of dextran which rotates the polarized light positively three times as much as sucrose. The reducing sugars were 15.01% for molasses, and 2.71% for bagasses, and only 0.185%, 0.94% and 0.88% for sugars, burnt cane juice and green cane juice respectively. Traces of ash were found in sugar samples, they did not exceed 0.09%. While molasses gave 10.5% for carbonated ash and 14% for sulphated ash, the bagasses gave 1.9% to 7.3%. Protein content in molasses ranged between 2.66% and 3.50%, while it was 1.98% to 2.56% in bagasses, and not exceeding 1% in sugar samples. The average percentage of moisture in molasses and bagasses was 20% and 50.8 %, respectively. The viscosity was in the range of 1.880 to 1.921, 1.870 - 2.019 and 4.958 to 5.038 centistokes for sugar, juices and molasses, respectively. The mean aperture of sugar crystals did not exceed 0.98 mm. The colour, which was measured colourimetrically, was in the range of 234 to 262, 906 - 10110 and 10200 to 11210 IU (ICUMSA units) for sugars, green cane juice and burnt cane juice, respectively, at wave length of 560 nm. The bagasses gave 18.9% - 20.9%, 38.6% - 40.6% and 30.1% - 33.4%, for lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses, respectively.
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/handle/123456789/13364
Date: 2015-06-16


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