University of Khartoum

Studies on Clarias lazera (Garmout fish) from Sewage Ponds and the White Nile (Jebel Aulia) in Relation to Some Metals

Studies on Clarias lazera (Garmout fish) from Sewage Ponds and the White Nile (Jebel Aulia) in Relation to Some Metals

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Title: Studies on Clarias lazera (Garmout fish) from Sewage Ponds and the White Nile (Jebel Aulia) in Relation to Some Metals
Author: Sumaia Adam Abd El Majeed, Ahmed
Abstract: This work was carried out to study the concentration of some metals from sewage treated water and the White Nile (Jebel Aulia). Samples of Clarias lazera (Garmout) fish, water, mud and plants were collected from both water bodies. The standard length, total body weight and sex were determined for each fish. The concentrations of some metals (nickel, cadmium, zinc, iron, copper and zinc) in ppm and the gross chemical composition (moisture, protein, fat, ash, fat to protein ratio and calorific value were determined for the fish flesh. The results showed that the concentration of some metals was very highly significantly different (p<0.001) in nickel, cadmium and zinc and highly significant difference (p<0.01) in iron, but no significant differences in copper and zinc. The concentration of these metals was higher than the permissible levels recognized by the World Health Organization. No significant differences (p>0.05) were found in fish weight from both water bodies but significant correlation (p<0.05) between standard length and body weight and between flesh weight and drying time. The chemical analysis showed highly significant differences (p<0.01) in protein, fat and ash and insignificant differences (p>0.05) in water in C. lazera from both water bodies. With respect to water from both study sites, the differences in concentration of copper and nickel were very highly significant (p<0.01) while the differences in cadmium, iron, lead and zinc were insignificant (p>0.05). The concentration of copper, lead, iron and nickel was higher in sewage treated water as compared with White Nile VII water. The concentration of the studied metals in mud was found to be higher in sewage ponds than from the White Nile. With respect to the studied metals only nickel showed significant difference (p<0.05) between the plants from both study sites. The results of this study calls for adoption of standardized research methodology to determine the concentration of heavy metals in the abiotic components of the environment throughout the different component of the food chain in order to quantify the bioaccumulation of metals due to their negative impact on living organisms.
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/handle/123456789/13670
Date: 2015-06-17


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