University of Khartoum

Chemical and Microbiological Evaluation of Effluent Water From Soba Wastewater Treatment Plant and its Suitability For Irrigation OF Tomato and Onion

Chemical and Microbiological Evaluation of Effluent Water From Soba Wastewater Treatment Plant and its Suitability For Irrigation OF Tomato and Onion

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Title: Chemical and Microbiological Evaluation of Effluent Water From Soba Wastewater Treatment Plant and its Suitability For Irrigation OF Tomato and Onion
Author: Galaleldin, Ikhlas Mohammed
Abstract: The study aimed at evaluating the overall efficiency of the waste water treatment plant at Soba, and testing the suitability of the treated waste water for the irrigation of vegetables that are eaten raw, with emphasis on microbial contamination of the irrigated plants in comparison with similar vegetables in market outlets. The investigation covered three main areas: a) Evaluation of the efficiency of the pond system through chemical, physical and biochemical analyses which included chemical oxygen demand (COD), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), pH, the water content of elements such as N, P, K, Cl, Cu, Pb, as well as turbidity, electrical conductivity and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR). b) Microbiological analyses, which included: estimation of the viable count of total bacteria faecal coliforms and faecal streptococci by the multiple tube method and the membrane filter method in addition to estimation of the numbers of eggs and larvae of pathogenic worms. These parameters were compared with those obtained on Nile water, borehole water and tap water. c) Irrigation of two cultivars each of tomato and onion plants with the above four water sources in clay soil as well as in silty and sandy soils, and evaluation of plant responses in terms of fresh weight, dry weight, and tissue N, P, K and heavy metal contents. Plant, microbial load were also determined on whole plants and on the parts that are usually eaten (fruits or bulbs) and were compared to those of similar plants on sale in the local market. Results were also compared to the standards provided by the WHO and FAO organizations. The results of the present study have indicated that the treated wastewater was richer in plant nutrients in comparison to Nile water or borehole water. However, the treated wastewater had the highest microbial loads, followed by Nile water, then borehole water. Plants irrigated with treated wastewater exhibited better growth and productivity than those received Nile water, followed by those received borehole water. The microbial loads of wastewater-irrigated plants was even higher than that of plants obtained from the local market. It could be concluded that the Soba wastewater treatment plant (an acceptable) degree of efficiency in removing the organic and inorganic load of the wastewater. The pH, salinity, chlorine content and the content of soluble salts in the treated wastewater were within the allowable limits of the WHO and FAO standards. The pond system showed good efficiency in removing the indicator bacteria but the numbers of these bacteria remaining after the treatment were still greater than the allowable limits for vegetables to be eaten without cooking. This can cause certain health hazards to farmers and their families, to consumers and to people dwelling near the pond system.
Description: 213 Pages
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/handle/123456789/13715
Date: 2015-06-18


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