University of Khartoum

Studies on the Effects of Sorghum Gluten Feed on Egg Quality and Laying Performance of white Leghorn Hens.

Studies on the Effects of Sorghum Gluten Feed on Egg Quality and Laying Performance of white Leghorn Hens.

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Title: Studies on the Effects of Sorghum Gluten Feed on Egg Quality and Laying Performance of white Leghorn Hens.
Author: E Fadil Ahmed, El Zubeir
Abstract: Composite samples of sorghum gluten feed (SGF), were obtained from a starch and glucose production unit and chemically analyzed. The chemical analysis revealed that SGF contains 28% crude protein, 3.9% ether extract, 5.8% crude fibre, 0.31 g/100 g protein lysine, 0.48 g/100 g protein methionine, 0.34 g/kg calcium, 187 mg/kg zinc, 240.5 mg/kg manganese and 793 mg/kg iron. True metabolic energy (TME) content of SGF was 13.07 M /kg. Chemical analysis content of SGF suggests a potential feed ingredient for poultry. A series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the nutritive value of SGF for laying hens and its effect on egg quality. Feeding graded levels (0, 10, 20 and 30%) of SGF reduced the rate of egg lay and body weight gain (P<0.05). Feed conversion ratio (FCR) tended to be poor with increasing levels of SGF. Egg weight, yolk colour, shell thickness and feed intake were not affected by SGF inclusion in the diet. In order to explain the reasons why SGF at high levels reduced laying performance, SGF based diets were supplemented with lysine and methionine. Addition of lysine significantly increased rate of egg lay, feed intake, egg weight and improved FCR (P<0.05). Addition of methionine only increased egg weight. No interaction between dietary lysine and methionine was observed for the parameters measured. Replacement of soybeans meal protein (SBM) with increasing levels of SGF protein in iso-nitrogenous, iso-energetic diet, caused a linear reduction in the rate of egg lay, FCR and shell thickness (P<0.0l). At levels lower than 50% SGF protein can replace SBM protein without adverse effects on laying hen performance. An experiment was conducted to compare apparent fat absorption (AFA) of SGF based diet with a SGF free diet. The results showed that inclusion of SGF at 30% decreased AFA by 18.2%. From the results it appears that high (>10%) levels of SGF can be tolerated but low levels (<10%) would be most appropriate for laying hens. SGF based diets need to be supplemented with lysine and methionine. The reasons for the low performance of hens fed high levels of SGF need to be resolved.
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/handle/123456789/13780
Date: 2015-06-22


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