University of Khartoum

The Impact of Talh Wood-Borer Sinoxylon senegalensis, Karch (Coleoptera, Bostrychidae) on the Production of Charcoal Quantitatively and Qualitatively

The Impact of Talh Wood-Borer Sinoxylon senegalensis, Karch (Coleoptera, Bostrychidae) on the Production of Charcoal Quantitatively and Qualitatively

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Title: The Impact of Talh Wood-Borer Sinoxylon senegalensis, Karch (Coleoptera, Bostrychidae) on the Production of Charcoal Quantitatively and Qualitatively
Author: Abd El Hafiz El Obied, Mohamed
Abstract: The study proved that the vertical stacking of talh logs (Acacia seyal) resulted in significantly more infestation by the talh borer Sinoxylon senegalense Karsch as compared to horizontal stacking in both seasons. The mean number of beetle pores was 19.8 in vertically stacked logs, whereas in horizontal it was 11.2 pores in summer season. The mean number of pores in winter season was 22.2 pores in vertical stacking and 13.3 pores in horizontal stacking. In both seasons, there were no significant differences in trial pores in both stacking types. Also the color of the bark has no significant effect on the frequency of infestation. The talh logs, which were kept inside a dark storeroom in summer season, received significantly more pores on average (44.9) as compared to logs stacked under partial shade (23.5 pores). However, logs kept under direct sun light received the least number of pores (8.8 on average). In winter season the logs in the dark storeroom received 41.9 in the dark store, 22.7 in the logs under partial shade, whereas logs under direct sunlight received 9.3 pores on average. The mean loss of wood material, as a result of beetle infestation, was 70.10%, 50.23% and 40.9% in the talh logs kept inside a storeroom, under partial shade and under direct sunlight, respectively, after two months in each season. In summer the loss % was 71.3% in logs in the dark storeroom, 43.65% in logs under partial shade, and 32.03% in logs under direct sunlight. In winter season the means loss % was 68.9%, 57.2% and 47.92% in the three types of shade, respectively. Thus, loss of wood material was significantly affected by the storage conditions, in both seasons. The bark color had no significant effect on loss of wood material. It is evident that logs of A. seyal were most preferred by S. senegalense, which were more heavily attacked (23.83) as compared to sunt, mesquite and kafur which received 1.8, 0.66 and 0.33 pores, respectively, in a period of two months. Debarking of talh logs significantly reduced infestation by S. senegalense as the mean number of beetle pores dropped from 19 pores in under barked logs to 0.7 pores after debarking. The moisture content of the log has a significant effect on infestation. Freshly cut talh logs (36.03 m.c %) were most heavily attacked by S. senegalense (42 pores on average in two months). Infestation was very little in (10.11 m.c %) dry logs (0.2 pores on average); water soaked logs (47.2 m.c %) were completely uninfected throughout the year. A significant direct correlation (p = 001. , y = 0.1 x + 4) was recorded between the frequency of infestation and log diameter. As the log diameter increases, the frequency of infestation increases. However, no correlation was found between trial pores and log diameter. The average life cycle of S. senegalense in the field was 77 days (63-90 days) in summer and 90 days (84-405 days) in winter from the appearance of the first in star larva to the emergence of the new adults. In the laboratory the life cycle was 70 days on average. The study of the physical and chemical properties of charcoal produced from talh, showed that infestation significantly reduced the calorific value from 28.07 kj/kg of charcoal in healthy logs to 22.07 kj / kg in a period of two months. The moisture content percentage was greater in charcoal produced from healthy talh logs (1.64 %) as compared to that of beetle infested talh logs (0.51 %). However, no differences in volatile matter were recorded comparing charcoal produced from healthy and infested talh logs. The mean ash content was more (9.93 gm) in the case of infested logs (9.93 gm) than in healthy logs (7.717 gm). The mean fixed carbon amounted to 71.17% in undamaged talh logs however, in infested logs it was not significantly reduced, and amounted to 69.6%. The density of charcoal was the same in both infested and healthy logs (0.43 g/cm3).
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/handle/123456789/13860
Date: 2015-06-22


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