University of Khartoum

Study on Fusarium (Fusarium oxysproum Sch1.F.Sp. Melonis Sny. and Han.) Wilt Disease of Melon (Cucumism melo L.) in Khartoum Area

Study on Fusarium (Fusarium oxysproum Sch1.F.Sp. Melonis Sny. and Han.) Wilt Disease of Melon (Cucumism melo L.) in Khartoum Area

Show full item record

Title: Study on Fusarium (Fusarium oxysproum Sch1.F.Sp. Melonis Sny. and Han.) Wilt Disease of Melon (Cucumism melo L.) in Khartoum Area
Author: Ahmed, Fatma Sir El Khatim
Abstract: This study was conducted to evaluate the occurrence of muskmelon wilt disease in the Sudan. The study included identification of the casual agent; pathogenicity test; disease survey; the effect of different sources of nitrogen fertilizer; varietal susceptibility of melon of Fasarium wilt, the effect of environmental factors and the effect of Meloidogyne sp. as a pre- disposing agent on wilt incidence. The result obtained revealed that, the casual agent of wilt of muskmelon is Fusarium oxysporum f sp. melonis and the isolated organism was able to induce wilt symptoms when it was inoculated to the plants. Also, the result has shown that, sowing date is of paramount importance in determining the incidence and severity of wilt. The highest disease incidence of 51.8% was recorded when sowing was performed during October. The field experiment carried at Shambat Research station (season 1994/95 and 1995/96) have revealed that the disease incidence was much affected by the type of fertilizer added. The highest disease incidence was recorded when organic nitrogen (chicken manure) was added to the soil, followed by the combination (organic + inorganic nitrogen) and then inorganic nitrogen (urea). Also, the pathogen induces different levels of disease incidence on the varieties grown. It was found that, variety Galia F1 was more susceptible, Ananas; Reglanti and local were moderately susceptible and Maglanti was outstandingly resistant. Disease incidence was influenced by soil conditions and it was more severe at soil moistures 25.5 and 28%, soil temperatures 18 and 19°C in both seasons. Also, disease incidence increased with increasing plant age (weeks 8 and 9) in both seasons. The greenhouse experiment revealed that, there was a correlation between F. oxysporum f. sp. melonis and nematode (Meloidogyne sp.). The disease was more severe when nematodes were present in the rhizosphere of the susceptible varieties which were acting as a predisposing agent.
Description: 1997
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/handle/123456789/14223
Date: 2015-06-23


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

Share

Search DSpace


Browse

My Account