University of Khartoum

Studies on Bovine Onchocerciasis Caused by Onchocerca Armillata, Railliet and Henry 1909, In the Sudan

Studies on Bovine Onchocerciasis Caused by Onchocerca Armillata, Railliet and Henry 1909, In the Sudan

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Title: Studies on Bovine Onchocerciasis Caused by Onchocerca Armillata, Railliet and Henry 1909, In the Sudan
Author: Awad Mahgoub Atta El Mannan, El Mannan
Abstract: A survey was undertaken to determine prevalence of aortic onchocerciasis amongst Sudanese cattle. Skin biopsies were collected from 315 animals of different age groups and from different localities in the country. The skin snips were taken with a snipper and were shredded in saline or Tyrode's solution for the release of microfilariae. Skin microfilariae were detected in 100/315 (35%) animals surveyed and the prevalence increased with age of the animals where 7% of 1-year old calves, 53% of 5- year old, and 75% of 8- year old cattle were infected. More male animals were infected than females (36% and 20%) and animals from different localities had different infection rates 7% and 13% in animals at Kuku village and the University Farm, respectively and 43% in animals from Western Sudan. The skin snip survey was supplemented by an aortic survey carried out at Omdurman Central Abattoir and Kosti Slaughter House. This survey revealed a higher rate of infection (92%) indicating that the skin snip method is an under-estimation of the rate of infection as many animals that had been negative for skin microfilariae were found infected at postmorten examination. Similarly, aortic infection was found to increase with the age of the animals: 78% in young animals, 92.7% and 96.5% in adults and aged animals, respectively. A large number of aortic vessels were collected and thoroughly examined for gross pathological lesions, and some sections were made for histopathological study. The thoracic aorta, brachiocephalic trunks, brachial arteries, costocervical arteries and the abdominal aorta up to the biforcation of the iliacs were found with moderate to severe lesions. Nevertheless, no clinical manifestations could be detected in these animals. A thorough morphological study was carried out using fresh specimens including a sizeable number of complete male worms, posterior and anterior extremities of females and fragments of both sexes. Studies were also undertaken to determine the possible vector of O. armillata in the Sudan which could well be Culicoides spp., but definite vector determination was hampered by the failure of microfilarial intrathoracic injections. The technique used needs to be refined and will be reattempted at a later date.
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/handle/123456789/14375
Date: 2015-06-23


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