University of Khartoum

The Use of Crop Residues from Gezira Irrigated Scheme for Feeding Lactating Nubian Goats

The Use of Crop Residues from Gezira Irrigated Scheme for Feeding Lactating Nubian Goats

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dc.contributor.advisor Omer Abd El Rahim en_US
dc.contributor.author Nadia Mohamed Ali, EL Aggab
dc.date.accessioned 2015-06-23T08:58:46Z
dc.date.available 2015-06-23T08:58:46Z
dc.date.issued 2015-06-23
dc.date.submitted 2002
dc.identifier.uri http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/handle/123456789/14449
dc.description.abstract This study was designed to assess the nutritive and economical value of some crop residues (sorghum straw ST, groundnut hay GH, pigeon pea hay PH and whole cotton seed WCS) in Gezira scheme. That was done by analysis and evaluating the chemical composition, digestibility degradability, of dry matter and feeding trials using Sudanese Nubian goats. Parameters studied were feed intake, body weight changes, milk production and composition. Also the study investigated the economics of different crop residues diets and their nutrient metabolizable energy content. The study also looked at the role of these by-products in livestock production and the incomes of tenants in Sudan Gezira Board (S.G.B.). The chemical composition of samples of these crop residues was determined. The results showed variability in chemical composition between WCS and fibrous crop residues (ST, GH and PH). Fibrous crop residues were characterized by high fibre content (40.62 - 48.6%), low protein (3.62 -7.16%) and low ME (8.57 - 8.95 Mj/kgDM). WCS had relatively low fibre content (25.38%), high protein content (20.69%) and high ME 14.54 Mj/kg DM. Digestibility trial showed there were significant differences (P < 0.05) between WCS and other crop residues. WCS had the highest digestibility of DM, OM, CP, NFE, NDF and ADF (73, 77, 98, 94, 57.7, 76.66 and 77.9, respectively) compared to crop residues which had lower digestibilities. To study the effect of crop residues diets on animal production, two experiments were conducted using thirty six female Nubian goats in each experiment. The goats were divided into four groups according to crop residues diets used. Each group was further divided into 3 sub-groups (replicates) according to parity number and body weight. The results of the experiment covered ten weeks lactation period and indicated that the group fed on WCS diet had DMl 28% and 30% higher than the average DMI of the other three groups calculated on metabolic live weight and daily intake basis, respectively. Changes in live weight of the experimental animals during the first ten weeks of lactation showed a minimum loss of 0.012 kg/day/animal observed for the WCS diet group. The highest loss was found in the group fed on groundnut hay diet (0.076kg/day/animal). The group fed on WCS diet had the highest milk production (0.79kg/day/animal) compared to the other groups fed on fibrous crop residues. Taking the group fed on ST diet as a base, the total milk production of the first ten weeks of lactation was 1, 1.13, 1.37 and 1.89 for ST, GH, PH and W.C.S. groups, respectively. The group fed on ST showed higher fat percentage (3.67%) than the other groups. No significant difference in other components of milk was found among different groups. Evaluation in terms of ME of nutrient composition showed that WCS had the highest cost of nutrients compared to the other crop residues. Also it was clear that the price of one kg DM was higher than the price of one kg as fed. Cost of ME of WCS. was found to be 9, 2.98, 2.29 times that of ST, GH and PH, respectively. The cost of by-products at market site was found to be 4, 2.5, 1.4 and 1.1 times the prices in the production area for ST, GH, PH and WCS, respectively. This was mainly due to bulkiness and transportation costs of fibrous crop residues. Financial evaluation showed the cost of WCS diets was 18% higher than ST diets while total feed cost/Animal/10 weeks of WCS group was 43% higher than average of the other fibrous crop residues. Total income/animal/10 weeks of WCS group was 59% higher than the average of the other groups. To study the role of crop residues in livestock production and income of tenants, two types of questionnaires were prepared one for tenants and the other for field inspectors and senior administrators of S.G.B. The study used multistage stratified random sampling techniques based on geographic and administrative divisions. The divisions selected for this survey represented the Gezira and El Mangil extension. The main objectives of the sampling process were to compile data on the evaluation of crop residues, uses, production and general information about management and husbandry of animal production in S.G.B. and the best animal production activity adopted in S.G.B. Data analysis showed that most of the tenants were livestock owners, and the main problems facing introduction of animal production in the rotation were shortage of water, fodder seeds, lack of extension and other problems. Also it was clear that most of the administrators in S.G.B. preferred to have milk production in their division. From this study it is clear that the Sudan Nubian goat is a good dairy breed and that care is required for the preparation of diets for milking goats i.e. using good quality feed ingredients. It may be necessary to improve the nutritive value of low quality agro industrial by-products by chemical, mechanical or other means when used in goat diets. It is also necessary to avoid selective intake by the animal by pelleting, grinding and through mixing of the diet offered. To make full use of crop residues, animal production should be introduced where crop residues are abundant and cheap all year round. Further studies were suggested for using treated crop residues in feeding goats to improve their nutritive value. en_US
dc.publisher UOFK en_US
dc.subject Crop Residues,Gezira Irrigated Scheme,Feeding,Lactating Nubian Goats en_US
dc.title The Use of Crop Residues from Gezira Irrigated Scheme for Feeding Lactating Nubian Goats en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.Degree Ph.D en_US
dc.Faculty faculty of Animal Production en_US
dc.contributor.faculty Dairy Production en_US

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