University of Khartoum

The Effectiveness of Community Based Rangelands Rehabilitation Projects in Sahelian Sudan: the case of Giriegikh Scheme in North Kordofan

The Effectiveness of Community Based Rangelands Rehabilitation Projects in Sahelian Sudan: the case of Giriegikh Scheme in North Kordofan

Show full item record

Title: The Effectiveness of Community Based Rangelands Rehabilitation Projects in Sahelian Sudan: the case of Giriegikh Scheme in North Kordofan
Author: Alredaisy,Samir Mohamed Ali Hassan; Ahmed, Najla Mohamed
Abstract: The objective of this study was to assess rangeland rehabilitation community based projects in Sahelian Sudan with specific focus on Giriegikh scheme in north Kordofan in order to verify the important role of such projects into environmental conservation and rural community development. Fieldwork surveys were conducted during 2005 and 2006 into human population and flora community including protected and non- protected rangelands. Results depict that annual xerophytes contribute by 65.2% into vegetative cover. Protected rangelands rank first into flora biodiversity and similarity. Highest values of relative density, abundance and frequency for perennial grasses are 49%, 46% and 70% flora/m2 respectively while they were 83%, 69% and 61% flora/m2 respectively for annual grasses. Oldenlandia virgata and Eragrosis tremula are the densest annual grasses while A. mutabtis are most abundant grasses. Perennials relative frequency accounted highest in individually owned protected rangelands dominantly by Cenchrus biflorus and Aristida pallida and lowest in open rangelands inside the scheme. Average qualitative density in protected rangelands is 8 plant/m2 and 11.2% plant/m2in nonprotected rangelands. Trees density measurements ranked Leptadenia pyrotenica first in all types of rangelands. From 1997 through to 2006 there is improvement into tree relative density (0.3% to 8% flora/m2), abundance (5.4% to 12.3% flora/m2), coverage (14.3% to 28.5% flora/m2) and frequency (0.1% to 9.3% flora/m2). People shifted from old direct sun drying forage conservation technique to shadow drying technique. In some protected rangelands fodder production is fivefold that in non protected rangelands. The population of Goats declined by 33.1% in 2006; The number of sedentary nomads increased from 11,4% to 20.7%. In addition, 73.8% of the population has stopped tree logging, reduced daily consumption of wood and charcoal by 1.7 kg and 50% of them use mud as building material instead of complete dependence on trees. The authors suggest the promotion of rangelands in Sahelian Sudan.
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/123456789/16594
Date: 2011-02


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

Share

Search DSpace


Browse

My Account