University of Khartoum

Effect of Management Practices on Body Characteristics of Sudan Desert Sheep (Hamari type) raised on range conditions

Effect of Management Practices on Body Characteristics of Sudan Desert Sheep (Hamari type) raised on range conditions

Show full item record

Title: Effect of Management Practices on Body Characteristics of Sudan Desert Sheep (Hamari type) raised on range conditions
Author: Addouma, Omer Mohammed Bushara
Abstract: The aim of this work was to study production potential of Hamari sheep, particularly flock size and structure, management practices as well as carcass characteristics under range condition in Geibash locality. North Kordofan state, Sudan. A semi-structured questionnaire was designed to generate relevant information about these flocks form randomly selected owners. Weights and body measurements were recorded from150 animals. The data of carcass characteristics and non carcass components were taken, at Geibash abattoir from 19 females of two age groups; young group (up to 18 months) and old group (more than 18 months). The results indicated that flock size was of three types, namely small, medium and large; and their means were 56, 156, and 400 head respectively. Breeding females constituted 50% of all flock types, breeding male ranged from 3 % to 5 %, castrates represented 22 % to 23 % in small and medium flocks and 31% in large ones. Suckling lambs ranged from 5 % to 7 %, while weaned lambs constituted 3 % to 8 % in the different flocks. Castration practice was mainly to control breeding and for fattening of castrates. The main methods used were crushing of spermatic cord between two wood rods (92.1%), and Berdizzo (7.9%). Identification of animals was done at the third month of age, either by ear cutting (39 %), fire branding (8 %), or both ways (45 %), however 8 % of herder’s did not use identification marks. The management of feeding depended only on natural pasture; however some flock owners gave food supplements to pregnant ewes and weak individuals of the flock. The live weight of Hamari sheep ranged from 35 kg to 61kg for milk teeth to three pairs of permanent incisors. The mean weight of mature males and females were 46.9 kg and 45.2 kg respectively. Body measurements showed progressive increase with age, and sex appeared to have significant effect on these parameters. The birth rate was 113 %, single born rate was 86.7 %, while twin’s rate was low about 13.3 %. Age at first lambing was 24 months, and lambing interval was one year. Breeding was controlled by kunan, and breeding season begins at the first February, to allow lambing during rainy season. The mean birth weight of single males and females were 3.50 kg, and 2.95 kg respectively, while the mean for twins’ males was 2.17 kg and twin females 2.13 kg. Mortality rate was 4.2 % in adult ewes and 2.2 % in suckling and it was 1% in weaned and 1.5% in adult rams. Culling of animals depended on their senility and weakness. Slaughter data showed significance different (P<0.01) in slaughter and hot carcass weight between young females and old ewes. However, no significant differences were detected in percentage weight of non carcass components between them, and these components were relatively heavier in young females. The dressing percentage was 46.8 in young ewes and 49 in old ones. These data indicated that the Hamari sheep type performed satisfactory under natural conditions irrespective of the various environmental and nutrition limitations. Improvement of nutrition through supplementary feeding, particularly during the dry season, and all year round breeding through abandoning of kunan are expected to improve productivity of this sheep type
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/123456789/16784
Date: 2015-10-28


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

Share

Search DSpace


Browse

My Account