University of Khartoum

Phytoremediation of Phenolic Pollutants in Industrial Wastewater Using Two Oxidative Enzymes

Phytoremediation of Phenolic Pollutants in Industrial Wastewater Using Two Oxidative Enzymes

Show full item record

Title: Phytoremediation of Phenolic Pollutants in Industrial Wastewater Using Two Oxidative Enzymes
Author: Nogud, Israa Salah Hamad
Abstract: The purpose of this research was to assess on laboratory scale the potential use of crude polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase extracts from Portulaca oleracea, Sonchus oleraceus, Xanthium strumarium, Cyperus rotandus and Trianthema portulacastrum in order to biodegrade polyphenolic pollutants in industrial wastewater. The crude enzymes were characterized and their ability to degrade or detoxify the phenolic pollutants in industrial and synthetic wastewaters was tested. The targeted enzymes from each plant were extracted in buffer solutions using a refrigerated centrifuge. The activities of the enzymes at different experimental conditions, and their ability to remove the phenolic pollutants from wastewaters were determined using spectrophotometric methods. Characterization studies indicated that the investigated enzymes were very active over a broad pH (3-9) and temperature ranges (30-80 ºC) and had a wide range of substrate specificity. The two enzymes were more active in alkaline media and markedly stable up to one-month incubation. Polypenol oxidase showed high activity at temperatures up to 80ºC while peroxidase was relatively inactive above 50ºC.The kinetic constant values revealed that polyphenol oxidase from C. rotandus had a high affinity towards catechol as substrate. Ammonium sulphate and acetone procedures were found to be very efficient for partially purifying the crude enzymes. All the isolated enzymes from the studied plants were proved to be very effective in eliminating phenolic pollutants from wastewaters. The highest phenol-degradation rate (97%) was measured when polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase enzymes from C. rotandus were incubated separately with synthetic wastewaters for half an hour. Thus, C. rotandus can be considered as a good source of these enzymes for the removal of phenol and phenol derivatives from wastewaters. In conclusion, these findings could possibly contribute to a better understanding of the enzymatic processes involved in phytoremediation of phenol and might have important implications in the use of these plants or their enzymes as inexpensive systems for decontamination of polluted environments.
Description: 93page
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/123456789/16866
Date: 2015-11-03


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

Share

Search DSpace


Browse

My Account