University of Khartoum

Taxonomy and Ecology of Exotic Plants of Central Sudan

Taxonomy and Ecology of Exotic Plants of Central Sudan

Show full item record

Title: Taxonomy and Ecology of Exotic Plants of Central Sudan
Author: Mohamed, Zainab Abdel Halim
Abstract: This work deals with the Ecology and Taxonomy of Exotic Plants of Central Sudan. This study aims to establish a data-base for Exotic Plants of Central Sudan, collect data on purposes and dates of introduction, utilization, geographical distribution, and ex-and in-site conservation of these plants. Field trips were arranged to four States of Central Sudan, namely: Khartoum, Gezira, Sennar and the White Nile. These trips covered private and governmental nurseries in addition to the National Botanic Garden, Khartoum. Samples of exotic plants were collected and identified. Nomenclature and synonyms have been updated. The collected species have been briefly described. Notes on habit, geographical distribution, origin, date and purpose of introduction, utilization and ecological constrains have been given. The collected species were documented via digital camera images and a dry collection has been prepared in an attempt to make a nucleus of a future herbarium for exotic plants. Personal communications have been carried out with noted statesmen and individuals (Appendix 1 attached) to explore the history, ecological problems, adaptation and well-being of exotic plants in Central Sudan. Pioneer Exotic Woody Plants that entered Sudan far before its Independence in 1956 are still doing well and most of them are naturalized. Good examples of these are Azadiracta indica (Neem), Albizzia lebbeck,Ficus benghalensis and Mangifera indica (Mango). The major findings of this study were: 642 exotic species were identified belonging to 315 genera and 97 families. The families, genera and species have been alphabetically arranged. The major Families were: Leguminosae (Fabaceae), Malvaceae, Myrtaceae, Compositae (Asteraceae), Verbinaceae, Gramineae (Poaceae), Euphorbiaceae, Palmae (Arecaceae), Solanaceae and Convolvulaceae. The major genera were: Eucalyptus, Gossypium, Acacia, Clerodendron, Albizzia, Citrus, Ficus, Cassia and Euphorbia. The commonest species were: Eucalyptus spp., Euphorbia spp. Rosa spp., Azadiracta indica, Mangifera indica, Ficus benghalensis, Acacia spp. and Albizzia lebbeck. The trees composed 38%, the shrubs 28% while the herbs composed 34% of the taxa. Examples of the pioneer species introduced as early as 1900 or even before then were: Mangifera indica, Ficus benghalensis and F. sycomorus. The major types of utilization were: ornamentals, street and avenue trees, forest products, fruits and vegetables, fibers and cash crops. The major countries of origin were: India, North America, Australia, South Africa, Brazil, Egypt and Britain. The study recommends the initiation of a master plan for introduction and conservation of exotic plants, establishment of flower shops and stands, Botanic Gardens for exotic plants in each state and finally the provision of a Quarantine station to control the introduction of exotics, catered for by well-equipped Nurseries.
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/123456789/17076
Date: 2015-11-15


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

Share

Search DSpace


Browse

My Account