University of Khartoum

Lead Residue Present in Food Cooked in locally Made Aluminum Alloy Utensils (Tambalbay pots)

Lead Residue Present in Food Cooked in locally Made Aluminum Alloy Utensils (Tambalbay pots)

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Title: Lead Residue Present in Food Cooked in locally Made Aluminum Alloy Utensils (Tambalbay pots)
Author: Ibrahim, Elham Mohammed Ahmed
Abstract: Background: Lead is one of the toxic heavy metals, commonly encountered in the environment, it has no biological role in the body. It accumulate in the body of man and animals through water, food and air up to critical toxic level, There is evidence that chronic kidney disease may result from prolonged exposure to even small regular intake of lead, lead poisoning is serious because it is associated with aneamia and renal damage. Lead also has the ability to mimic and interrupt the role of other biological important metals, the most notable of which are calcium, iron and zinc. A recent study implicated the fall of the Roman Empire to poisoning of soldiers by lead which was used in lining their water pipes. The poisoning evidence was based on high lead level found in their bones and teeth. After phasing out lead in gasoline, reducing lead level in food should be our greatest health priority because most people receive the largest portion of their daily lead intake via air and food. The use of lead contaminated utensils is a major source of food contamination. Especially when the use is at high temperature and long time such as cooking. In this study the focus will be on the locally made aluminum alloy utensils (Tambalbay pots) which are widely spread and used in many Sudanese houses, the production of these pots id made without serious quality control. Objective The aim of this study is to detect lead residue in food cooked in locally made aluminum alloy utensils (Tambalbay pots). Methods This study was conducted at Khartoum state three different Tambalbay pots were used in the experiment and were labeled as follows: 1. Type a, New Tambalbay pot. 2. Type b, Tambalbay pot used for ten years and made from known materials (old aluminum pots). 3. Type c, Tambalbay pot used for more than fifteen years. Metalic sample from each of the three types of Tambalbay pot covers was analyzed for lead residue also samples of food cooked in each of the three pots was analyzed. All the samples (Metalic and food) preparation and analysis for lead residue according to Reilly, 1980 and Perking Elmer Corporation ltd, 1994. And read by flame atomic absorption spectrometer. Results All the food samples which were cooked in three types of Tambalbay pots exceed the maximum permissible lead level 0.3mg/kg recommended by Codex Alimentarious Commission. Lead residue in food increased as cooking temperature and duration time increased. Conclusion The use of Tambalbay pots as cooking pots represents a serious health risk because of the high degree of lead contamination the food.
Description: 78page
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/handle/123456789/17398
Date: 2015-12-02


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