University of Khartoum

Farming, Herding, Water And Rangeland In The Butana

Farming, Herding, Water And Rangeland In The Butana

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Title: Farming, Herding, Water And Rangeland In The Butana
Author: Alredaisy, Samir Mohamed Ali Hassan; Tinier ,Abdelaziem; Jack Davies
Abstract: Conflict between crop growers and herders is not a new problem. The nomad has always looked down upon the farmer because farmers are seen as people tied down to a particular place whereas the nomad has the freedom to move around as part of the search for pasture and water for the animals. This ability to move from place to place is important in semi-arid lands like the western part of the Butana plain (Figures 1A & 1B) as rainfall fluctuations bringing drought give the mobility of nomadism a distinct advantage over sedentary cultivation. However, since the 1990s conflict between the two groups has become much more serious. Pressure on water and grazing was noted as long ago as the 1950s. One of the authors remembers in 1957 a hakra (tribal gathering) arranged by the Singa District Commissioner, Alim Ramadan, to discuss the problem with the chiefs of the Kenana and Rufa’s El Hoi tribes, the outcome of which was to allow some fereigs (family groups) who traditionally did not cross into the lands between the White and Blue Niles to do so in the dry season because of a shortage of water and accessible pasture caused by increasing population and an increase in the areas under mechanized agriculture.
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/handle/123456789/18987
Date: 2011


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