University of Khartoum

Geography, Gender and Money Profits in Sudanese General Private Education: The Example of Khartoum State

Geography, Gender and Money Profits in Sudanese General Private Education: The Example of Khartoum State

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Title: Geography, Gender and Money Profits in Sudanese General Private Education: The Example of Khartoum State
Author: Alredaisy, Samir Mohamed Ali Hassan
Abstract: The objective of this paper was to investigate general private education in Sudan with the main focus on the geography, gender and money profits in Khartoum state based on fieldwork and data published by Administration of Non Governmental Education of Khartoum state in 2011. Results depict that private education contribute by 41.7% in the total number of schools in the state. In number of schools in basic education, private schools hold 35.7% while in secondary education it holds 58.1%. There are statistical significant difference into distribution of private secondary schools by locality and there is less dispersion into secondary schools compared to basic schools. There is no compliance into school numbering by locality in private basic and secondary education. the calculated value of chi-square for private secondary schools is less than the private basic schools indicating to less dispersion into secondary schools compared to basic schools. Rank Spearman's correlation value of – 0.4 and Kendal's of – 0.5 depict to distribution of number of private basic schools as not to be necessarily correlated with number of private secondary schools. From the total number of basic private students males constitute 53.7% and females 46.3% which gives 7.4% excess males. In gender concerns, there is 7.4% excess males. There is significant statistical difference between numbers of males and females in private basic education while there is no statistical significant difference between both sex in private secondary education. There appears to be close correspondence between number of schools and number of students in basic private education contrary to private secondary education. Private education employs 14.33% of teachers involved in basic education and 13.92% of teachers involved in secondary education. Male teachers dominate private secondary education and almost equal to female teachers in basic private education. The total net income of private education is estimated as 39.4% of the total annual income. The author suggests some strategies to recruit government free education to decelerate private schooling to exclude poor Sudanese to save payment on private education to meet the increasing basic life demands in situation of increasing inflation.
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/handle/123456789/18988
Date: 2011


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