University of Khartoum

Assessment ofExtension Needs to Improve Animal Health and Production Delivery System in Alsyal Village, River Nile State, Sudan.

Assessment ofExtension Needs to Improve Animal Health and Production Delivery System in Alsyal Village, River Nile State, Sudan.

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Title: Assessment ofExtension Needs to Improve Animal Health and Production Delivery System in Alsyal Village, River Nile State, Sudan.
Author: Ibrahim, Sara Tajelser Ahmed
Abstract: The objective of this study was to assess the community awareness about proper animal husbandry and management, assess community awareness about public health and its relation to animal, and to develop extension messages to lead to improvement of animal health and fill the gap. It was carried out in Alsyal village in River Nile state. The village was chosen purposely to represent the area of rural community. Primary data well collected through a questionnaire, direct observation and visualization, and secondary data well collected from the records. Ninety questionnaires were filled between 9 and 23 July 2011 to assess the primary sources of veterinary services and awareness of the communities about the principles of veterinary public health. The respondents were representatives from the animal owners found in Alsyal village. A second questionnaire for livestock problems was filed by 5 practicing veterinarians from the public and private sectors in the study area. A check list was prepared to evaluate the status of animal health and production, using conventional grading (Housing, milking, feeding, animal health care). Mapping was constructed to determine livestock contact patterns, according to grazing area, water sources, habitat of insect vectors, trade routes, seasonal calendars and emergency movement, to describe the patterns of disease in a location. Secondary data collection from veterinary hospital and units included five governmental and private veterinary hospitals and units selected for assessment of veterinary public health and veterinary extension .The records were studied to estimate problems of livestock, the presence of veterinary extension and situation of veterinary public health. The results of the questionnaires showed that 20% of the respondents were illiterate, 16.7% had informal education, 35.6% had basic level education and 27.8% had secondary education. Livestock was 85.6% personal ownership, 2.2% tenant and 12.2% shared partnership. Animals were used for dairy production (milk production 33.3% ;milk and trade 66.7%). The types of animals that were owned by the respondents were goats, sheep, cattle and other farm animals. Different sources of water were observed; River Nile, wells and irrigation canals. Animal fodder availability was according to season and price. Four types of animal’s housing were recorded; at home, coral and open grazing.Source of animal health care, rate of animal health problems in different species, knowledge of the community on diseases and their vectors were assessed from the 90 respondents. Cases from Alsyal village which were submitted to the public Veterinary clinic and the private veterinary center in Shendi,were observed and recorded. The animals which exhibited health problems comprised82.2%. Seventy four of the respondents had animal health problems. The health problems among affected herds were 63 (85.1%), 7(9.5%) and 4 (5.4%) in sheep, goats and cattle respectively. Sixteen (17.8%) of the respondents stated that their animals were not suffering from health problems. Regarding the treatment, the majority of animals were treated by ownersin (58.9%), Veterinarians were consulted in 17.8% and 23.3%of owners used mixed prescribes from traditional healers and Veterinarians. All respondents confirmed lack of extension about animal health. According to records, only three extension messages were carried out in the last 3 years. An extension message was designed to improve awareness about animal health. It followed the model of field visits and direct meetings with residents of the village including pastoralists. The message was mainly directed to methodsof tick control including; proper housing, tick’s life-cycle and spraying protocols. To conclude one can say that, Veterinary services concentrated on animal health,while veterinary extension messages were scarce.
Description: 12 Pages
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/handle/123456789/19993
Date: 2016-03-24


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