University of Khartoum

Gingival Crevicular Blood Glucose for Diabetes Detection in Dental Clinic

Gingival Crevicular Blood Glucose for Diabetes Detection in Dental Clinic

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Title: Gingival Crevicular Blood Glucose for Diabetes Detection in Dental Clinic
Author: Khalaf, Saadou Sami Saadou
Abstract: Background: many patients with chronic periodontitis may have undiagnosed diabetes. Portable glucometer provides a simple method for rapid monitoring of the glucose level in the blood by utilizing a blood sample from the finger, but this method requires a needle puncture to obtain blood. It is possible that gingival crevicular blood (GCB) from routine periodontal probing may be a source of blood for glucose measurements. The Aim of this study is to determine if gingival crevicular blood can be used as a method of detection for diabetes during regular periodontal examination using portable glucometer (Diatalk®, manufactured by TaiDoc, Taiwan). Materials and method: Ninety two patients (forty two males and fifty females) with chronic periodontitis took part in the study, the mean age of all participants was 40.5±12 years, seven patients (7.6%) of them were known diabetics, and 2 are not diagnosed as diabetic patients and were diagnosed later in the study. Periodontal pocket probing was performed using a periodontal probe (William's pattern). The patient`s periodontal status severity was assessed using CPITN. Blood oozing from gingival sulcus/pocket following periodontal pocket probing was directly collected using test strip of the portable glucometer (Diatalk®). As control, fingerstick capillary blood was analyzed by the same method. Statistical analysis was performed using Pearson's correlation Coefficient and paired -t- test to compare the gingival crevicular blood glucose (GCBG) and capillary finger blood glucose (CFBG), spearman`s correlation was used to correlate the CFBG to the patient`s periodontal status severity as reflected by CPITN, and finally a survey was done to find out the patient preference towards the method of blood collection. Result: The GCBG and CFBG levels derived from all samples was found within the range of 41 to 334 mg/ dl with a mean±SD of 85.9 ±46.3 and ranged from 77 to 427 with mean±SD 118.6 ±52.3.respectively. statistically significant relation between GCBG and CFBG levels in the total samples was found , significant difference between GCBG and CFBG for the total sample was found (r= 0.921, p= 0.000) , no relation was observed between the severity of periodontitis reflected by CPITN scores and blood glucose level using the CFBG readings (p<0.099). Regarding patients preference towards the method of blood collection, it was found that 44 patients (47.8%) preferred the finger prick, while 26 patients (28.3%) preferred the glucose measurement during periodontal examination, moreover 21patient (22.8%) claimed that the two methods of blood collection were the same and one patient (1.1%) did not prefer any of the two methods of blood collection. Conclusion: the result did not find any support to the preference of using GCB for testing blood glucose level during routine periodontal examination for the detection of diabetes during routine dental visit. In addition the method was not always easy to perform and was not also preferred by the majority of the patients.
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/handle/123456789/20059
Date: 2016-03-24


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