University of Khartoum

Antimicrobial Effect of Serum Peptides of Sudanese Domestic Animals

Antimicrobial Effect of Serum Peptides of Sudanese Domestic Animals

Show full item record

Title: Antimicrobial Effect of Serum Peptides of Sudanese Domestic Animals
Author: Mohamed, Ahmedelmontaser Omer Mergani
Abstract: Antibiotics have been an effective weapon against bacterial infections for over 50 years. However, bacterial resistance towards conventional antibiotics has increased considerably within the last decades and the number of antibacterial agents available for treating complicated bacterial infections is becoming increasingly limited. In the search for alternatives therapies, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have received considerable attention since they target the bacterial Achilles’ heel, i.e. their distinct membrane structure. These host defense molecules are ubiquitous in nature and have an exceptional ability to increase the sensitivity of resistant bacteria toward antibiotics. This study aimed to show the antibacterial activity of serum constituents, particularly the antimicrobial peptides. In this study, bacteria were provided by the Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine. They were isolated from clinical specimens, (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus fecalis, Bacillus spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis and Salmonella spp.), and tested for their susceptibility to antimicrobial peptides containing serum filtrate from Sudanese farm animals (cattle, sheep, goats, horses and camels) individually by two methods (impregnated filter paper and cup plate method). Serum samples (30 samples) were collected from those animals and were concentrated by centrifugation using high speed “free standing” centrifuge used at 18,800 xG speed, at 4°C., for 10 minutes. Also the same bacteria above were tested for their susceptibility to commonly used antibiotics in Sudan in order to be compared with sensitivity test done to the AMPs containing serum against the bacteria. It is concluded that serum filtrates possess an inhibitory action against Gram positive and Gram-negative bacteria isolated in Sudan in vitro. High speed centrifugation of serum was a very effective method to isolate and bring out the inhibitory effects of serum. The cup plate method is a very simple method and gives clear results. Serum filtrates, especially from horses and camels, have a very heuristic and hopeful antimicrobial action which will pave the way for a new generation of antibiotics, (the horse serum filtrate had the largest inhibition zone means, while the camel filtrate had the broadest spectra against tested bacteria). The main studies and investigations recommended are performing studies on other spectra of infectious bacteria, enrollment of molecular and separation techniques to examine the activity of each individual antimicrobial peptide and determining the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of any of those antimicrobial peptides.
Description: 100 Pages
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/handle/123456789/20088
Date: 2016-03-24


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

Share

Search DSpace


Browse

My Account