University of Khartoum

Level of Dry Mouth and Its Effect on the Quality of Life in Patients Wearing Maxillary Obturator Prostheses

Level of Dry Mouth and Its Effect on the Quality of Life in Patients Wearing Maxillary Obturator Prostheses

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Title: Level of Dry Mouth and Its Effect on the Quality of Life in Patients Wearing Maxillary Obturator Prostheses
Author: Elhag, Sajda Abdelgaffar Hussein
Abstract: Background: Dry mouth is recognized in contemporary dental practice as an important risk factor for dental disease. Wearing maxillary obturator prostheses will be compromised further by dry mouth. This study aimed to assess the level of dry mouth in patients wearing maxillary obturators and how it affected their quality of life. As well as, to investigate factors influencing dry mouth in these patients. Methods: This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study, in which the dry mouth of 30 Sudanese patients with obturator prostheses was examined by direct measurement of saliva and subjective symptoms of dry mouth were surveyed using a single global question. Their Oral-Health-Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL) was measured using a validated Sudanese-Arabic translated version (OHIP-14s-ar) of the short form Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14). Results: Thirty patients were examined in this study. Their age ranged between 16 and 78 years old. Their unstimulated flow rate ranged between 0.026 & 0.571g/min, with a mean value of 0.214g/min. The prevalence of salivary gland hypofunction was VI 30%, and the prevalence of xerostomia was 36.7% in the sample studied. Partial maxillectomy patients represented 66.7% of the sample studied, hemimaxillectomy patients were 26.7% and the sub-total maxillectomy patients were 6.7%. Gender had a significant relation with objective dry mouth (p-value = 0.046). A significant association was detected between patients with subjective dry mouth and radiotherapy (p-value = 0.002). A statistical correlation existed between patients suffering from objectively diagnosed dry mouth and subjectively felt dry mouth (p-value = 0.004), 77.8% of the patients with objective dry mouth suffered also from subjective dry mouth. The prevalence of any subscale of the OHIP-14s-ar was consistently higher in the group suffering from subjective dry mouth. Conclusions: Dry mouth affects negatively the OHRQoL of obturator patients. Radiotherapy had the strongest impact causing dry mouth in patients wearing maxillary obturators. Therefore, prevention of oral dryness and palliative care is vital for these patients. Patients wearing obturator prosthesis should be examined regularly for both subjective and objective dry mouth.
Description: 105page
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/handle/123456789/20106
Date: 2016-03-27


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