University of Khartoum

Analysis of TK and C18L Genes of Wild-type and Cell Culture Passaged Camelpox Virus

Analysis of TK and C18L Genes of Wild-type and Cell Culture Passaged Camelpox Virus

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Title: Analysis of TK and C18L Genes of Wild-type and Cell Culture Passaged Camelpox Virus
Author: Salim, Bashir O.M.
Abstract: Camelpox is an infectious skin disease of camels caused by camelpox virus (CMLV). It is confined to camel rearing belts of developing countries (Wernery U, et al., 2002). CMLV is classified in the Orthopoxvirus (OPV) genus of the subfamily Chordopoxvirinae in the Poxviridae family. Camelpox is considered a possible zoonosis and under certain circumstances it can be mildly pathogenic in humans (Duraffour S, et al., 2011). The disease, restricted to camels, is enzootic in almost every region where camel breeding is practiced with the exception of Australia (Duraffour S, et al., 2011). Camelpox occurs in epizootics that lasts for 2-5 months with higher prevalence in winter and it mostly affects young animals of less than four years old (Khalafalla A I, et al., 1996). As a result of major economic losses from disease outbreaks, research has been oriented toward the development of live-attenuated and killed vaccines (Hafez S M, et al., 1992; Nguyen Ba-Vy, et al., 1996; Pfeffer M, et al., 1996; Wernery U, et al., 1999). CMLV can be adapted to grow in a variety of primary and transformed cells derived from camel, lamb, calf, pig, monkey, chicken, hamster and mouse (Duraffour S, et al., 2011). However, the molecular
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/123456789/21222


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