University of Khartoum

Time of Sowing Sorghum (Sorghum Bicolor) As Affected By Nitrogen Mineralization from FYM Manure in Three Soil Types

Time of Sowing Sorghum (Sorghum Bicolor) As Affected By Nitrogen Mineralization from FYM Manure in Three Soil Types

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Title: Time of Sowing Sorghum (Sorghum Bicolor) As Affected By Nitrogen Mineralization from FYM Manure in Three Soil Types
Author: Abdalla, Mubarak Abdelrahman; Awadelkarim, A.H.; Gassm Alsayied, A. G.
Abstract: Synchronizing inorganic nitrogen during mineralization of added organic matter uptake by the subsequent crop is an environmentally sound. In this study, laboratory and field experiments were conducted to estimate (in the first) potential mineral N (NH4-N + NO3-N) release pattern from farm yard manure (FYM) applied to three soil types and to determine (in the second experiment) the optimum time for sowing (one, two and three weeks after manure application) fodder sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) after application of the manure (10 t ha-1). Potentially mineralizable N was determined by mixing farmyard manure with surface soil (0-30 cm) collected from sandy clay, clay loam and clay soils. The mixture was aerobically incubated for 12 weeks at about 70% water holding capacity and mineral N was determined at a week interval time. All amended soils immobilized N during the first week, but later had net release of inorganic N. Maximum N mineralization (14 - 15.6% and 13.9%) from added N were obtained after 9 and 7 weeks in the light and heavy textured soils, respectively. By the end of the incubation period, total net mineral N accumulated in the sandy clay, clay loam and clay soils were 91.7, 91.5 and 34.2 mg N kg -1, respectively. In the light soils, sowing sorghum after two to three weeks from incorporation of manure had significantly higher dry matter yields than after one week, whereas, in the heavy textured soil, sowing date had no significant effect. It could be concluded that adjusting sowing date, in light texture soils, of the subsequent crop after manure incorporation might better improve yield.
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/123456789/22268


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