University of Khartoum

Rural – Urban Profile of Nutritional Status of Sudanese ChildrenLess than Ten Year Old: Rural Western Kordofan and Urban Khartoum State

Rural – Urban Profile of Nutritional Status of Sudanese ChildrenLess than Ten Year Old: Rural Western Kordofan and Urban Khartoum State

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Title: Rural – Urban Profile of Nutritional Status of Sudanese ChildrenLess than Ten Year Old: Rural Western Kordofan and Urban Khartoum State
Author: Alredaisy, Samir Mohamed Ali Hassan; Ibrahim,Hashim Suleiman; Saeed,Harm Omer Elhag
Abstract: This paper objects to assess nutritional status of children less than ten year old in rural and urban Sudan as based upon two field surveys. The first one was carried out during 2005 in rural western Kordofan to assess the nutritional status of children less than 10 years old, and the second one took place during February 2009 in the three central children hospitals in Khartoum State to assess nutritional status of children suffering anemia and night blindness. The main findings of the fieldwork in rural western Kordofan depicted an average contribution of each of the carbohydrates, protein and fat with 58.2%, 9.5%, and 32.3%, to the total energy with fat slightly higher and carbohydrates lower than the recommended values. Cereals products provided 45.7% of total consumption and 45.2% of total protein. About 58.3% of the children suffered from underweight and 72.8% were moderate underweight while 80.6% suffered from severe underweight. Wasting prevalence was 37.9% (19.6% as moderate and 18.3% as severe). Stunting prevalence was 23.7% (12.3% moderate and 11.4% as severe). The second fieldwork in Khartoum State depicted that physical symptoms of anemia are loss of appetite ( 87.7%), paleness ( 93.5%), exhaust, and eating clay ( 29%), while for night blindness they were xerophthalmia (20%); Pinot spots (52%); karatomalacia (12%), and Cornea ulceration (4%). Severe malnutrition constituted 63% of cases of children suffering anemia and night blindness. Children suffering anemia and night blindness distributed among different age groups have very low percent of hemoglobin concentration below 60% standard, confirming for prevalence of Iron deficiency anemia. Malnutrition was highest among children aged 1-3 year old, and females are less malnourished compared to males. There was low energy (calories), Iron and Vitamin A levels of intake among these children. Both surveys depicted prevalence of malnutrition and confirms for a similar problem facing rural and urban Sudan. The authors suggested some recommendations to improve nutritional status of children in both geographic settings.
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/123456789/22487
Date: 2012


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