University of Khartoum

Detection of Change in Vegetation Cover Caused by Desert Locust in Sudan

Detection of Change in Vegetation Cover Caused by Desert Locust in Sudan

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Title: Detection of Change in Vegetation Cover Caused by Desert Locust in Sudan
Author: Eltoum, Mohammed; Eltoum, Mohammed
Abstract: the problem of desert locust infestation increased as a consequence of rainfall increase in several areas suitable for desert locust breeding. In 2012, several desert locust outbreaks were reported in Africa mainly in Libya, Niger, Mali and Chad. The main objective of this research was to detect changes in vegetation state caused by desert locust infestation in the Sudan, using remote sensing (RS) and geographical information System (GIS). Enhanced vegetation index (EVI5) data, from MODIS satellite image and ancillary ground survey data, were integrated and three maps were produced. These maps were Sudan desert locust damaged-vegetation assessment map in 2012, Subset map of Khartoum State where desert locust activity took place in vegetated area in 2012 and vegetations damaged temporal change detection map. Zonal attribute analysis, post-classification change detection approach and image classification were performed. The results of desert locust damaged-vegetation map 2012 showed that the mean pixel value of infested areas is significantly different from healthy areas (p ≤ 0.02). The means pixel values of infested vegetation were 68.600, 66.839 and 73.770 during years of 2010, 2011 and 2012, respectively. Those of non-infested vegetation were 65.790, 65.006 and 77.600 during the years of 2010, 2011 and 2012, respectively. These results were used as guide for producing Sudan desert locust damaged-vegetation assessment map in 2012. In subset of Khartoum State, a temporal change in vegetation damage was detected and a total loss of 520.15 hectares of vegetation in three months, as result of desert locust activity in 2012 was recorded. It is concluded that Sudan is threatened by desert locust; it could be detected and monitored using RS and GIS. Real time monitoring approach is recommended to solve any coming problems. Therefore, RS and GIS techniques are recommended to be part of the existing Early Warning System and control strategy in Sudan.
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/123456789/22778
Date: 2014


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