University of Khartoum

Changes in Morphology of the Prostate and Bulbourethral Glands and Hormonal Levels Following Vasectomy and Vasectomy Reversal in Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

Changes in Morphology of the Prostate and Bulbourethral Glands and Hormonal Levels Following Vasectomy and Vasectomy Reversal in Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

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Title: Changes in Morphology of the Prostate and Bulbourethral Glands and Hormonal Levels Following Vasectomy and Vasectomy Reversal in Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus)
Author: Mohamed, Khalid Elamin Awad
Abstract: This study investigated the morphological changes in the prostate and bulbourethral glands of the rabbit following bilateral vasectomy and vasectomy reversal and the possible concomitant histochemical and hormonal changes. Thirty two New Zealand white rabbits were divided into 3 groups; 4 animals were used for normal control, 8 for vasectomy (2 animals per group) and 20 animals (5animals per group) for vasectomy reversal. Trans-abdominal vasectomy was done for all rabbits except the normal controls. After 16 weeks, loupe-assisted vasectomy reversal was carried out (through the same vasectomy scar). The rabbits of vasectomy reversal were divided into four groups with 4 weeks interval between each group and the other as follows; group 1: sampled 8 weeks following vasectomy reversal, group 2: 12 weeks following vasectomy reversal, group 3: 16 weeks following vasectomy reversal and group 4: 20 weeks following vasectomy reversal. The surgical procedures were done in an operation room in Faculty of Medicine – University of Khartoum under general anesthesia. Tissue samples from the prostate and bulbourethral glands, from all groups, were collected for histology, histochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. Blood samples were collected, immediately before tissue sampling, for hormonal assays (testosterone, FSH and LH). Data of hormone assays were analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) computer software (IBM Corporation). The laboratory work was done in the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine - University of Khartoum and University of Pretoria - South Africa. Results of light and transmission electron microscopy showed that normal rabbit III prostate gland has histological similarities to other mammalian species. In the prostate, with vasectomy, there was a gradual decrease in height of epithelial secretory cells, decrease in number of secretory granules and changes in basal cells. Similar morphological changes were noticed in vasectomy reversal animals, an observation which may indicate persistence of effects of vasectomy. These changes were accompanied by increase in collagenous fibers and decrease in reticular fibers. Histochemical examination of the secretory cells of the prostate showed the presence of glycogen as the source of energy. In normal control animals, vasectomy and vasectomy reversal, glycogen concentration was not changed. Under light and transmission electron microscopic examination, the normal rabbit bulbourethral gland revealed round acini lined by pyramidal cells. With vasectomy and vasectomy reversal, there was a change of pyramidal cells into columnar or cuboidal cells and a decrease in secretory granules indicating decreased secretory function. As in the prostate, the changes caused by vasectomy, were not reversed by vasectomy reversal. Glycogen was the carbohydrate detected in the bulbourethral gland, and it was more intense with vasectomy and variable with vasectomy reversal. Results of hormonal assay showed linear decrease of testosterone over time which coincides with decrease in the cellular height and surface area i.e decrease in testosterone level may contribute to the morphological changes. With vasectomy reversal there was slow increase in the levels of testosterone. Low levels of testosterone may have stimulated the pituitary gland to increase secretion of FSH and LH through the negative feedback mechanism. In conclusions, vasectomy causes a decrease in glandular IV surface area in both prostate and bulbourethral glands that apparently persists with vasectomy reversal. Slow rise of testosterone in vasectomy reversal animals may indicate reversal of these changes. This study recommends performing more vasectomy and vasectomy reversal experiments on other mammalian species taking into consideration keeping the animals for longer periods of time to verify if morphological changes due to vasectomy would be reversed once again.
Description: 231 Pages
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/123456789/24508


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