University of Khartoum

Study Of Malaria among Pregnant Women Admitted to Sinnar Teaching Hospital : Proportion and Risk Factors

Study Of Malaria among Pregnant Women Admitted to Sinnar Teaching Hospital : Proportion and Risk Factors

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Title: Study Of Malaria among Pregnant Women Admitted to Sinnar Teaching Hospital : Proportion and Risk Factors
Author: Madani, Fagr Ali Elzain
Abstract: Background: Malaria during pregnancy is a major public health problem in tropical regions throughout the world. It can have adverse effects on both mothers and fetus, including maternal anemia , fetal loss, premature delivery, intrauterine growth retardation and delivery of low birth- weight infants (<2500g or <5.5 pounds). The aim of the study was to investigate proportion of malaria and possible factors associated with malaria among pregnant women from maythe1 to Junethe1 2009 .This was a descriptive cross sectional study conducted at Sinnar Teaching Hospital . Materials and Methods : A hundred and forty-five pregnant women attending Sinnar Teaching Hospital were included by total coverage during study period. Data were collected by a pre tested questionnaire and laboratory investigation for thick and thin blood films. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Science (SPSS). The different variables were checked using chi-square and p<0.05 was considered significant. Results: The proportion of malaria among pregnant women was 15.9% with 95.9% of malaria cases due to falciparum specie infection. There was a significant statistical association between occupation (workers), education (illiterate), family income(less than SD 300) and malaria positivity (P=0.0001) , (P=0.025) and (P=0.04) respectively. The results revealed a statistical association between awareness of pregnant women towards the disease and infection (p=0.001). The low infection was among pregnant women who used insecticide treated nets (4.1%) compared to those who did not use them (21.3%), and low infection was among those who used intermittent preventive treatment (9.25%) compared to those who did not use (21.3%). There was a significant statistical association between screening windows and doors and low rate of infection (P=0.0001). Additionally, there was a statistical association between accumulation of water near the houses, indoor and malaria infection (P =0.0001). Conclusion: Malaria proportion was high among illiterate women, low income families and working women. Screening windows and doors proved to be effective. We recommend preventive measures by using insecticide treated nets, introduction of chemoprophylaxis policy and health education to raise pregnant women awareness about malaria.
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/123456789/24709


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