University of Khartoum

Intelligence Testing In An Afro-Arab Islamic Culture: The Northern Sudan

Intelligence Testing In An Afro-Arab Islamic Culture: The Northern Sudan

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Title: Intelligence Testing In An Afro-Arab Islamic Culture: The Northern Sudan
Author: Khaleefa, Omar H.; Ashria, Ikhlas H.
Abstract: Psychological tests as a psycho-technology are urgently needed for educational, occupational, counselling, and clinical assessment in the Sudan (Khalecfa, 1987). However, there were no standardized tests for the Sudanese local environment except an attempt carried out by Scott (1950) and Badri (1966). Psychological tests are needed for the maximum utilization of human resources in the newly developing nations in Africa and elsewhere. The rapidly expanding educational facilities in these countries require testing for admission purposes as well as for individual counselling. With increasing industrialization, there is a demand for tests to help with job selection and placement of personnel, particularly in mechanical, clerical, and professional fields (Anastasi, 1961). Badri (1979) points out that psychometry is an area in which Western psychology has offered one of its greatest contributions to science. This is particularly true of the more objective measurements like intelligence tests, personality inventories, and vocational guidance tests. But for such Western psychological tests to be of any help in Muslim countries, a good deal of adaptation and standardization must be carried out. The great differences between European super-industrialized countries and Muslim developing societies can invalidate the results of unadapted tests. A number of investigators from various sociocultural systems have agreed upon the limitations of Western or modern psychology when applied across indigenous or traditional cultures (Berry, 1974; Azuma, 1984; Ching, 1984; Lagmay, 1984; Sinha, 1980; Hoshino and Umemoto, 1986; Moghaddam and Taylor, 1985; Moghaddam, 1993; Georgas, 1993; Enriquez, 1993). According to Ombredane (1958), the testing of Africans assessed mainly their degree of acculturation and familiarity with European ways of thinking. Africans were still governed by their custom-
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/123456789/25657
Date: 1995


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