University of Khartoum

Evaluation of Wetlands as Organic Carbon Reservoirs Toaddress the Challenges of Climate Change

Evaluation of Wetlands as Organic Carbon Reservoirs Toaddress the Challenges of Climate Change

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Title: Evaluation of Wetlands as Organic Carbon Reservoirs Toaddress the Challenges of Climate Change
Author: Osman, Manal Abdelrahim
Abstract: The effect of climate change is unequivocal. The projected rise of temperature 1.4 - 5.8ºC will impair the ecosystems on Earth and hinder their abilities to function properly. This will lead to habitat loss and thus organisms’ extinction. Wetlands although their existence is in small percentage of the Earth surface (4-6%) but are an important unseen carbon sink more rich than forest and rangeland per area. In this study three forested riverine wetlands, (Sunut and Bankieu wetlands), and a mangrove forest wetland, (Kilo Tammania wetland), were examined. In summer season, samples were taken from 9 profiles: 3 in the wetland, 3 in the forest and 3 in the upland zone in each of the two forested riverine wetlands. In the mangrove forest wetland, 3 profiles were made carbon concentration was determined in the soil samples collected. In the winter season; 6 profiles were made in the wetlands only to compare the carbon stock with the summer season in the two forest riverine wetlands. The carbon turnover times were also measured to know the residence time of carbon in the soil using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) i.e. C14 dating. The wetlands’ floors were richer in carbon content than the forests’ floors and the uplands’ floors except in Sunut wetland, where the upland was richer than the wetland and the forest floor. The turnover times of the three wetlands were 404 years, -634.57 years, 3,397.74 years for Sunut, Bankieu and Killo Tammania respectively. Temperature and hydrology were taken as controlling factors. Bankieu wetland acted as a source of carbon in the second season due to the unsuccessful flooding event. These findings, based on past studies, were very satisfactory. In general, the arid tropical, (the study area), was more rich in carbon content than the tropical, subtropical and the temperate zones. This study revealed that the hydrology is an important controlling factor as well as the temperature and its pattern has been affected by the climate change. They in turn affect the wetlands as an important sink of CO2. The drainage and refilling of wetlands for the development will feedback the climate change negatively.
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/123456789/25836


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