University of Khartoum

The Outcome of Non-operative Management of Forearm Shaft Fractures in Children seen in Khartoum Teaching Hospital

The Outcome of Non-operative Management of Forearm Shaft Fractures in Children seen in Khartoum Teaching Hospital

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Title: The Outcome of Non-operative Management of Forearm Shaft Fractures in Children seen in Khartoum Teaching Hospital
Author: A.Rahman, Ahmed
Abstract: In this study which was conducted in one calendar year from the 1st of December 2002 to the 30th of November 2003, the total number of children with both forearm bones fracture included were 101, but only 64 of them were available for final assessment and analysis. All the patients have been seen and managed in Orthopaedics and Traumatology Department Khartoum Teaching Hospital. The data was collected after completing a questionnaire containing a detailed history, thorough clinical examination, radiographic check and follow up sheets. The aim of the study was to establish and find a scientific basis regarding age of the child, clinical presentation, level of fracture, radiographic features and outcome of conservative management in these patients. Of the 64 patients; males were 82.8% and females were 17.2%. The common affected age was 5 and 13 years. 50% of the patients resided at Khartoum region and most of the patients (76.6%) presented in the same day. The fracture followed a fall on the outstretched arm in 56.6%. The left forearm was involved in 67.2%, whereas the dominant hand was the right in 78.1%. In 56.3% patients the fracture was in the lower third, it was open fracture in 6.3% of the cases. Only in few cases the deformity was marked at presentation, which was mainly anterior angulation (50%). The fracture was an isolated injury in 92.2%. Manipulations to improve the alignment were done in 78.7% of the patients and in 10.9% the first aid was done by a bonesetter. The common problems found in the first referred clinic were fingers and hand swelling (32.8%), re-angulation occurred in (10.9%). In other visits the main problems were softening and slackening of the plaster. The major complication in the study was restriction of forearm rotation (12.5%), the rest of complications were minor. All patients were treated by closed manipulation if indicated and cast immobilization for a period ranging between 3 and 12 weeks. The final assessment was done six weeks after removal of the plaster and the outcome was thought to be good.
Description: 106page
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/7949
Date: 2015-04-01


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