University of Khartoum

Effect of Castration on Feedlot Performance, Carcass Characteristics and Meat Quality Of Western Sudan Baggara Bulls

Effect of Castration on Feedlot Performance, Carcass Characteristics and Meat Quality Of Western Sudan Baggara Bulls

Show full item record

Title: Effect of Castration on Feedlot Performance, Carcass Characteristics and Meat Quality Of Western Sudan Baggara Bulls
Author: Ismail,Hayat Abdelhameed
Abstract: Twenty-four Western Sudan Baggara bulls ranging in live body weight from 175-185kg and age from 2.0-2.5years were used to study the effect of castration on feedlot performance, carcass characteristics and meat quality. The animals were divided by stratified random sampling into two groups and the groups were randomly assigned to either castrated or entire treatment. The groups were fed ad libitum molasses based ration (11.09 MJ/kgDM, ME) and sorghum stover as 1.43kgDM/head/day. Green fodder ‘Medicago sativa’ was given as a supplementary source of vitamin A (2kg/head/2week). The bulls were slaughtered at an average target live weight of 258 kg (250-265 kg). A significant superiority of the intact bulls over the castrated ones was proved in the following studied parameters: they took shorter feeding period (P<0.05), scored higher for the measurements width of shoulder, hump base length (P<0.05), heart girth around the hump (P<0.001) and height at tip of hump (P<0.01). They also had heavier heads (P<0.05) and total genitalia (excluding fat) (P<0.001). Their carcasses recorded heavier neck and chuck and blade joints (P<0.05), heavier sirloin’s muscular tissue (P<0.05), higher muscle to fat (P<0.001) and bone to fat (P<0.001) ratios. The meat of the intact bulls was also proved to have higher moisture and protein percentages (P<0.05), ash, sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar protein percentages (P<0.001) and significantly higher pH (P<0.01). A non-significant superiority of the intact bulls over the castrated ones was proved in growth rate (0.89 vs. 0.82kg/day), feed conversion efficiency (8.85 vs. 9.44 kg DM/kg live wt. Gain) and the rib eye area (49.65 vs. 48.57 cm2). A significant superiority of the castrated bulls over the intact ones was detected in the following studied parameters: they scored higher for the measurements length from patella to posterior midline and depth of patella from tail junction (P<0.05). Higher percentage of genital fat (P<0.001), kidneys and pelvic fats (P<0.01), omental (P<0.001) and mesenteric fat (P<0.05). They were also found to have significantly thicker subcutaneous fat layer (P<0.001), higher chilled dressing percentage on empty body weight basis (P<0.05) and lower chiller shrinkage percentage (P<0.001). The meat of the castrated group had higher Hunter lightness value (P<0.001), superior water holding capacity (P<0.001), lower cooking loss percentage (P<0.001) and pH level (P<0.01). It was also of higher ether extract percentage (P<0.001), juicier (P<0.05) and had a better overall acceptability of the cooked meat (P<0.05). A non-significant superiority of the castrated bulls over the intact ones was shown in the carcass measurement leg circumference (95.33+5.61 vs. 92.92+4.25cm) and cold carcass weight (135.08+3.54 vs. 132.91+5.36kg).
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/8149
Date: 2006


Files in this item

Files Size Format View

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

Share

Search DSpace


Browse

My Account