University of Khartoum

The Potential Use Of Deep-Stacked Broiler Litter As A Ruminant Feed

The Potential Use Of Deep-Stacked Broiler Litter As A Ruminant Feed

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dc.contributor.advisor FAISAL AWAD AHMED en_US
dc.contributor.author HAMED, NUHA
dc.date.accessioned 2015-04-05T08:41:47Z
dc.date.available 2015-04-05T08:41:47Z
dc.date.issued 2015-04-05
dc.date.submitted 2007
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/8273
dc.description 125page
dc.description.abstract The objective of this research was to study the effect of feeding diets of deep-stacked broiler litter (DBL) on growth, dry matter intake, feed conversion ratio and carcass composition in Baggara cattle raised for 14 weeks. The effect of such diets on dry matter intake of sheep and goats was also studied. Further more the nutritive value of such diets was also studied. Thirty six Baggara intact bulls with 166.7±9.71 kg initial body weight were assigned in a randomized complete design to one of four dietary treatment groups that differed in DBL as a percentage of concentrate diet. The percentages in concentrate diet were 0%, 20%, 40% and 60%. Growth in term of total gain and daily gain was not affected by inclusion of processed litter in concentrate diet up to 40%. At higher inclusion rate (60%) both total gain and daily gain dropped (P<0.01). Dry matter intake was not affected by feeding processed litter (P>0.05) and so palatability. Feed conversion ratio deteriorated with increasing inclusion rate of DBL and became significantly lower at (P<0.05) at 60% inclusion rate. Dressing percentage was not affected by dietary treatments. Non carcass components as a percentage of empty body weight was affected differently by dietary treatments but generally tended to be heavier in slaughtered bulls fed poultry litter and that was reflected in that carcass weight in kg in term of empty body weight either hot or cold was lighter (P<0.001) in those bulls. The fat reservoir in body tissues tended to be lower in animal fed DBL than others and that resulted in less insulation of carcass and higher chiller shrinkage percentages. Whole sale cuts from bulls fed different levels of DBL as a percent of cold side weight were not affected by different dietary treatments. The same was true for the composition of the whole sale cut (sirloin) as a percent of the cut weight. xi Although the color of fresh meat of bulls fed DBL recorded by Hunter lab. Tristimulus Colorimeter was less light and more reddish (P<0.001), subjective evaluation of cooked meat by the semi trained panelist did not support that assumption and produced no odd odour or color of that meat. Digestibility study revealed no significant difference in organic matter digestibility. Crude protein digestibility decreased gradually as the inclusion rate of DBL increased in the experimental diets. In addition to that all of the experimental diets degraded extensively and quickly in the rumen of the fistulated bulls decreasing the percentage of by bass protein. Dry matter intake of dietary treatments by sheep and goats was not affected by inclusion of DBL in their diets and they experienced no palatability problems. The previously mentioned results indicate that DBL could be safely used as a feed ingredient for bulls without any effect on animal health or people consuming meat from such animals. DBL as a feed ingredient for sheep and goats was also acceptable. Inclusion of DBL in concentrate diets produced acceptable growth rates of bulls with compromisable prices. Digestibility results rated the experimental diets as low to high quality hay in term of organic matter digestibility and metabolizable energy contents. That reasonable growth rate achieved in this study coupled with moderate organic matter digestibility and high degradation of the experimental diets suggest that fattening mature Baggara bulls do not need high energy diets and a very small amount of bypass protein produces a reasonable growth; saving high quality protein for other types of productio en_US
dc.publisher UOFK en_US
dc.title The Potential Use Of Deep-Stacked Broiler Litter As A Ruminant Feed en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.Degree M.Sc en_US
dc.Faculty Animal Production en_US
dc.contributor.faculty Dairy Production en_US

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