University of Khartoum

SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS CARE SEEKING BEHAVIOR AMONG LONG DISTANCE TRUCK DRIVERS AT SOBA TRUCK DEPOT-MAY 2006

SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS CARE SEEKING BEHAVIOR AMONG LONG DISTANCE TRUCK DRIVERS AT SOBA TRUCK DEPOT-MAY 2006

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Title: SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS CARE SEEKING BEHAVIOR AMONG LONG DISTANCE TRUCK DRIVERS AT SOBA TRUCK DEPOT-MAY 2006
Author: Elmak, Suad
Abstract: Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) were ranked among the most important threats to public health. In developing countries STIs have for several decades ranked among the top five infections for which adult seek health care services. Recent evidence prove that people infected with STIs run much higher risks of contracting HIV infection through direct biological mechanisms, and with reduced awareness of people of such diseases and their sequel the need for control become ever pressing. Knowledge about health and health seeking behavior in relation to STIs, what makes people decide to seek professional attention for suspected STIs, or their priorities when using services for sexual health, can help pragramme planners to identify obstacles to early diagnosis and effective treatment of STIs and implement appropriate interventions. Truck drivers are a mobile group whose health is constantly under pressure, they are globally referred to as high-risk group who are highly vulnerable to HIV/AIDS/STI. Objective:- This descriptive cross-sectional community based study was conducted with attempt to study the prevalence, pattern, and determinants of health care-seeking behavior in relation to STIs among long distance truck drivers at soba truck depot. V Methodology: - A descriptive cross – sectional community based study at soba truck depot, in which structured, close ended questionnaire was administered to 422 truck drivers in addition to focus group discussion with 6 different groups. Result:- The study revealed that most of the respondents were Sudanese with mean age of 35 years, and low income (73.5%), knowledge was found to be high (92%). The prevalence of the main syndromes during the last 12 months was found to be 17.5% for urethral discharge, 5.7% for genital ulcer, and 12.3% for lower abdominal pain. The study showed low level of partner's notification (14.9%). Slightly more than half of our respondent (51%) selected governmental hospital for treatment, and reason for preference of health providers were found to be easy accessibility to services, confidentiality and good attitude of staff, availability of drugs with high level of satisfaction (95%). Treatment compliance found to be also high (87.9%), in contrast to very low condom use rate (5%). Health education message by health providers was very poor (5%). Stigma (38.1%), ignorance of disease and its sequel (23.8%), loss of privacy (9.5%), were the main barrier for seeking care. The study revealed significant relation between initiation of care and income, knowledge, and age (P=0.001, 0.005, 0.005 respectively, and insignificant relation with income (P=0.200), VI education (P=0.267) and Choice of health provider. Still no significant relation between accessibility to treatment and income (P=0.836) and education (P=0.668), Compliance with treatment was found to be significantly related to knowledge about STIs (P=0.005). Condom use was found to be significantly related to knowledge (P=0.006), but insignificantly related to age (P=0.338), and marital status (0.336). Conclusion:- The study concluded that the prevalence of STIs is similar to prevalence in African countries. Lay referral play important role in the management of STIs, easy accessibility to services and drugs, privacy, confidentiality, and friendly attitude of the health staff were the main reasons for preference of a health facility. Knowledge, income, and stigma, are important determinants of STIs care seeking behavior. Recommendations:- The main recommendation of this study was to improve the access to STIs services along the high ways, and at the truck stops. To raise awareness of the general population using media, video shows and tape cassette. Collaboration with different health care providers to use common STIs management protocol, focusing on behavior change, by peer and other education, and further exploring and enhancing condom use. As health seeking behavior is multidimensional including social, cultural, economical and VII psychological factors, a medical anthropological study design is also recommended to be conducted in the future.
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/handle/123456789/8886
Date: 2015-04-12


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