University of Khartoum

Soil Heterogeneity Assoclated with Desert trees And Shrubs growth At Elkabashi Area

Soil Heterogeneity Assoclated with Desert trees And Shrubs growth At Elkabashi Area

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Title: Soil Heterogeneity Assoclated with Desert trees And Shrubs growth At Elkabashi Area
Author: Hammad Nasser Ali, Sulieman
Abstract: Soils near Khartoum, Sudan, found under the crown of acacia (Acacia tortilis) and capparis (Capparis decidua) trees were compared at three depths to those collected from between the trees and from adjacent openings with respect to several physical, chemical, and biological properties. Trees had significant impacts on the physical, chemical, and biological properties of the soil. Analysis of variance showed that location main effect (canopy or open) differed significantly for all properties tested except pH, soil texture, moisture content and saturation percentage. Many characteristics examined varied with depth, with the exception of soluble K, Ca, and Mg, which increased, significantly with depth. Total nitrogen and 0.5 M NaHCO3 extractable phosphorus in soil under acacia canopies were about two times greater in the (0-30 cm) layer than those in the same layer in the open and between the trees and vice versa in capparis tree site. There were significant differences in C/N ratios and in the soluble cations and anions among locations. There were also significant differences in plant density and fungal numbers among locations. Aggregate stability was higher under trees than interspace and openings and was highest under capparis tree. There was s generally a significant correlation between organic matter percentage and aggregate stability (r2 = 0.45). Results suggest that leguminous trees improve soil conditions under their canopies by redistribution and consequent concentration of ions from areas beyond the canopy or from sub soil to surface soil beneath the canopy.
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/handle/123456789/9352
Date: 2015-04-23


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