University of Khartoum

The Role of Some Non-wood Forest Products in Sustainable Livelihood of Local Communities, Case of Um Rawaba Locality, Sudan

The Role of Some Non-wood Forest Products in Sustainable Livelihood of Local Communities, Case of Um Rawaba Locality, Sudan

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Title: The Role of Some Non-wood Forest Products in Sustainable Livelihood of Local Communities, Case of Um Rawaba Locality, Sudan
Author: Obeid,Mymoona Ali Elndeef
Abstract: This study investigates the contribution of some Non-wood Forest Products (NWFPs) to the sustainable livelihood of local communities in Um Rawaba Locality. The study attempts to identify the uses and importance of some NWFPs and to highlight constraints and measures of risks confronting investment in some NWFPs. Two types of data were used to collect the necessary information, namely, primary and secondary data. The primary data collected through interviewing with local people; and group discussion with Forests National Corporation (FNC) staff in the study area. The main findings of the research are; the majority of the respondents (70%) rely on agriculture as the main source of income besides collection of NWFPS. Handicraft activity based on NWFPs represents the second important activity for income generation. Some respondents (4.7%) rely solely on NWFPs for income generation. The main NWFPs collected from the study area includes Aradaib (fruits of Tamarindus indica), Garad (fruit of Acacia nilotica), Lalob (fruits of Balanities aegyptiaca), Goungolaiz fruits of (Adansonia digitata) and Sinamaka (pod of senna senna). There are some other NWFPs with limited uses. In the study area NWFPs are collected either for household consumption or for marketing (income generation). For household consumption, NWFPs are collected from distances varying between 1– 2.5 km, while for trading collectors may cross devastating areas for the sake of collecting considerable amount of NWFPs. Hand picking, tree climbing, sticks and stretched mats are used in the process of NWFPs collection. In the study area NWFPs do not contribute significantly to the budget of the (FNC). There are different channels through which the local people dispose their collected NWFPs. NWFPs are liable to damage by birds and insects, therefore their prices are determined by these iv factors. The FNC has not exerted any effort to inventor the resource or to assess the natural regeneration of the NWFPs producing trees. The main conclusions drawn from this study are; It seems that all the family members are indulging with NWFPS directly or indirectly, but still women remain the main collector of the NWFPS as asserted by 73.1% of the respondents indicating that NWFPS is a women profession in the study area. The collection of NWFPS last for five months (September to January) in the study area. The time calendar of collection of NWFPS differs from one product to another. The period between Octobers - December, showed high collection of Tabaldi, Heglig and Sidir fruits. Local people in the study area have limited channels for the disposal of their collected NWFPS. The study recommended some recommendations; The FNC should attempt to give special consideration for the NWFPs producing trees in terms of their regeneration, protection and inventory Extension services provided by the FNC should guarantee the sustainability of the resource for the coming generations.
Description: 83 Pages
URI: http://khartoumspace.uofk.edu/handle/123456789/9374
Date: 2015-04-23


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