Effect of Irrigation Intervals and Fertilizer Types on the Growth, Herbage Yield and Oil Content of CamelR42;s Hay (Cymbopogon schoenanthus (L.) Spreng.)

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Date
2015-06-15
Authors
Manar Haboub Ahmed Mohamed, Mohamed
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uofk
Abstract
This study was carried out at the Demonstration Farm of the Department of Horticulture, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Khartoum, Shambat during the period from March to September, 2009. Two experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of irrigation intervals (Experiment I) and response to mineral and organic fertilization (Experiment II) on the growth, yield and oil content of camel's hay plant (Cymbopogon schoenanthus (L.) Spreng.). In experiment I the treatments were 7, 10 and 14 days of irrigation intervals. The treatments were arranged in a randomized complete block design with three replications. Water was applied in the field using V-notch weir, and the quantity of water (same for each treatment of irrigation interval) was estimated by Blaney-Criddle method. The data collected were number of days to 50% flowering, plant height, number of tillers per plant and dry yield. They were recorded during vegetative stage 9 weeks after planting (WAP), 50% flowering stage 16-18 WAP and at maturity stage 22 WAP. The herbage yield (biomass dry yield) and its volatile oil content were also recorded for two cuts before flowering and at flowering stages; cut1 was from planting to 17 WAP, cut2 was the first regrowth of cut1 i.e. 7 weeks after the first cut. The results indicated that number of days to 50% flowering was not significantly affected by irrigation intervals. During vegetative growth and at 50% flowering stages, growth parameters and yield were not significantly affected by treatments; however, at maturity (22 WAP), 10 days irrigation interval gave significantly higher number of tillers per plant (112.07) and dry yield (14.73 ton/ha). Herbage yield and oil content were not significantly affected by irrigation intervals at both cuts. Oil content was increased by irrigation every14 days except before flowering of cut2 where 10 days gave the highest value. Oil content was higher in cut1 than in cut2; it was higher before flowering than at flowering for both cuts. In experiment II, the treatments were control (no fertilizer), two urea levels (285.7 kg N/ha and 571.4 kg N/ha) and two chicken manure levels (5.9 ton/ha and 11.9 ton/ha). The treatments were arranged in a randomized complete block design with three replications. Data collected were the same as in experiment I, except that days to 50% flowering were 15-16 weeks after planting. The results indicated that the number of days to 50% flowering was not significantly affected by fertilization treatments. Also, the results showed that fertilizers did not significantly affect growth and yield at the growth stages except at 50% flowering stage, where treatment 285.7 kg N/ha gave the highest plant height (158 cm) and number of tillers per plant (67.27). Also, 11.9 ton/ha of chicken manure had the highest plant height (76 cm) during vegetative growth and the highest dry weight (7.70 ton/ha) at 50% flowering. Herbage yield was not significantly affected by fertilization treatments at both cuts except before flowering stage of cut1 (9 weeks after planting), where treatment 285.7 kg N/ha gave slightly higher herbage yield (1.53 ton/ha) than other treatments. Oil content was significantly affected by fertilization at flowering but not before flowering stage of both cuts. Chicken manure at 5.9 ton/ha gave 3.87% in cut1 and urea at 571.4 kg N/ha in cut2 gave 3.27% at flowering. Oil content was higher before flowering than at flowering for the two cuts. Also, oil content was slightly higher in cut1 than cut2
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Effect of Irrigation Intervals and Fertilizer Types on the Growth, Herbage Yield and Oil Content of CamelR42;s Hay (Cymbopogon schoenanthus (L.) Spreng.)
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